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History

The Fenton was among a spate of hotels built to handle the throngs of visitors coming to Buffalo for the Pan-American Exposition in 1901. But it differs from most of the others, because it's still standing. Many hotels built for the exposition were temporary structures, but the Fenton was made to last. It has stood strong at Main and West Ferry streets since 1896. …

History

The Lenox Hotel is a noteworthy part of Buffalo's history — for many reasons. For one, it's Buffalo's oldest operating hotel, one that played host to many wealthy visitors to the Pan-American Exposition in 1901. It also briefly was home to famed author F. Scott Fitzgerald. For many today, the most important thing about the building is that a restaurant inside it supp…

History

Now the gateway to the Elmwood Village, the corner of Elmwood and Forest avenues was once the gateway to the Pan-American Exposition. In the years leading up to the 1901 fair, hotels began to spring up all over the city to anticipate the huge crowds. And the northeast corner of Elmwood and Forest was prime real estate to market to fairgoers, as it was a block away from …

History

Last week, Chronicles provided a whirlwind tour of some of the city’s most recent additions to its burgeoning hospitality market. Our tour, as expected, mentioned nothing of those hotels’ amenities – laudable as they may be – but explored the sites where they now stand. These sites – once the place of homes, businesses and, in one instance, a canal blamed for the outbre…

History

When it was announced that a Wyndham Hotel would occupy the long-dormant AM&A’s flagship department store, it was the most recent of several upscale hotel chains to enter into the city’s burgeoning hospitality market. Over the last four years, the Hilton, Marriott and Westin brands have planted their flags alongside such stalwarts as the Hyatt Regency and, more recentl…

History

The unassuming northeast corner where Main and Seneca streets intersect belies its history. Today, 237 Main St. is the site of a construction project to transform the 16-story building into a combination of apartments, offices and banquet space. Hints of the building’s past as headquarters of the Marine Trust Co. abound – whether they be the carvings of an anchor and th…

History

When John F. Kennedy was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963, it marked the first time in our nation’s history that an event of such magnitude was broadcast across our television screens. A stunned nation watched a visibly shaken Walter Cronkite announce the death of the president. The images that followed are forever etched in our collective memory: a solemn Lyndon B. Johnso…

History

It was a refrain commonly heard throughout our house as a child: “If you keep misbehaving, I’ll send you to Father Baker’s!” My mother never told me Father Baker had died 50 years earlier and that the orphanage so intimately linked to the iconic priest had closed. Perhaps my grandmother had also failed to mention these seemingly important details to my mother as a child…

History

From the moment French missionary and explorer Father Louis Hennepin laid eyes upon Niagara Falls, visitors to the natural wonder have been in awe of its majesty. The three waterfalls that collectively make up Niagara Falls — the Horseshoe Falls, the American Falls and the Bridal Veil Falls — attract an impressive 30 million visitors every year. For more than two centur…

History

The stately mansion that sits atop a small hill at 641 Delaware Ave. has a long, albeit spotty, history that predates its fame as the site of Theodore Roosevelt’s inauguration as the 26th president of the United States at the height of the Pan-American Exposition. Roosevelt, of course, was thrust into the presidency on Sept. 14, 1901, when William McKinley finally succu…

History

A series of postcards showing off different portions of Main Street give a fantastic look back at the Village of Williamsville and how it’s changed since the 1960s. [Column: You live in Williamsville? No, You don't.] Government buildings on the east side of Main are a mix of old and new. The building that once housed the Amherst Police is now the Williamsville…

History

For decades, the northeast corner of Elmwood Avenue and West Utica Street, with its mid-century brick bank building and large parking lot, looks like it would fit in almost any post-war-built suburb in America. But it was quite the city neighborhood centered at Elmwood and Utica for many decades. The area was one of several in the city that held mock elections for n…

History

Reconstruction of the Elmwood Avenue bridge over Route 198 is nearing completion after several years of work. Elmwood Avenue looked a bit different in 1895 when the bridge was first built over Scajaquada Creek. The Buffalo State campus was farmland behind the “State Insane Asylum,” and none of the museums surrounding the bridge had been built yet. This view l…

History

BN Chronicles takes postcards of several parts of Main Street from the past and compares them with current street views. Two views of Shelton Square, Main at Niagara.   Main no longer intersects with Niagara Street. That portion of Niagara Street was gobbled up by the Main Place complex.   Main at Court The corner once famous as…

History

In 1959, the Niagara Frontier Bottling Association took out an ad to remind Western New York’s children to bug their parents about returning soft drink bottles promptly. The Niagara Frontier Bottling Association had 21 members, including the giant names of Coca-Cola, Pepsi and 7-Up, but also much smaller local operations like Visniak, Queen-O and Oscar’s. Just as brewer…