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In 1958, The News opened a new printing plant with new presses on Scott Street, on land that once was part of the Lehigh Valley railroad depot. The new plant had 35 printing units arranged to operate as five giant presses, compared with 24 printing units operating as four presses at the old Main Street location. The new presses allowed The News to print a newspaper with mo…

In the decades following the building of 216-218 Main St., The News steadily expanded in the Main-Seneca area.In 1916, The News acquired a property on Pearl Street and remodeled it for use by the mailing department and use as stock and file rooms.In 1924, The News bought the old telephone building at Seneca and Pearl streets. In its place it built a four-story structure to…

By the mid-1890s, News founder Edward H. Butler Sr. decided that a growing operation required a new, modern building.In May 1896, demolition work started on 218 Main St., the building The News had occupied for 15 years, and 216 Main St., which Butler had bought from the Fairbanks Scale Co. In May 1897, The News moved into its new, six-story building at 216-218 Main St. (ab…

Even before the first edition of the Evening News in October 1880, founder Edward H. Butler Sr. bought 218 Main St. As soon as remodeling of the building was finished, the Evening News moved in July 1881 from its temporary headquarters at 214 Main St.The original 218 Main was a 20-foot-wide, four-story building. The business office (known as “the counting roomȁ…

The Sunday News had been published in 200 Main St. When The News went daily, founder Edward H. Butler Sr. moved it to 214 Main, which never was intended as anything but temporary quarters.John W. Rosenbach, onetime mechanical superintendent, recalled: “We had to carry our drinking and washing water from some pumps that were on the Terrace … There was no runni…

The News was a radio and television pioneer in Buffalo.Its radio station, WBEN (the call letters stood for Buffalo Evening News), went on the air Sept. 8, 1930, broadcasting from a studio in the corner of the 18th floor of the Hotel Statler.According to a 1951 internal history of WBEN, The News started out broadcasting all live, local programs – no national programs…

The original application for a television license was filed for The News by Alfred H. Kirchhofer, the newspaper’s top editor, in 1939. But he got back “a negative report.”After the end of World War II, the application was renewed and won FCC approval.WBEN-TV began experimental broadcasts in February 1947, and began regular programming May 14, 1948, as …

As big as WBEN-TV was in the United States in its early years, it was even bigger in Canada.According to a 1957 article in Canada’s The Globe Magazine, WBEN’s signal reached 600,000 New York TV sets – and more than 770,000 TV sets in southern Ontario.WBEN’s affiliation with CBS helped. In the late 1950s, CBS had the popular Ed Sullivan, Gunsmoke…

It seems senior citizens are getting younger in Hamburg. The Town Board has lowered the minimum age for participation in town organized senior citizen program from 60 to 55. "With our brand new renovated senior center, we have lots of room, lots of space to fill," said Martin Denecke, director of youth, recreation and senior services for the town. "We want to get more pe…

As The News went daily in 1880, William McIntosh was named managing editor – a post he would hold until his death 30 years later.McIntosh came to Buffalo from the New York Mail & Express and, as the first managing editor, worked at a long table in the center of the newsroom. In later years he occupied a small cubbyhole of a corner office.He was a wiry 5-feet, 6-…

The News first-day circulation of 7,000 papers had risen to 18,000 daily by the start of 1882, a little more than a year later. By the late 1880s, The News was claiming to be “the largest one-cent paper in the United States except the Chicago News.”The News’ first distribution system was largely Buffalo’s extensive system of horse-drawn streetca…

There appeared to be a love-hate relationship between Edward H. Butler Sr. and Grover Cleveland.Shortly after being elected Buffalo mayor, Cleveland sparked the interest of The News when he vetoed a street-cleaning job awarded to a contractor who was $100,000 over the low bidder.From then on, Butler gave his enthusiastic support as Mayor Cleveland battled the local politic…

One of the biggest stories in News history was the assassination of President William McKinley.McKinley was shot Sept. 6, 1901, on the grounds of the Pan American Exposition in Buffalo. He died Sept. 14 in a home on Delaware Avenue. Theodore Roosevelt was inaugurated in the Wilcox home on Delaware Avenue, then went across Delaware to preside at his first Cabinet meeting in…