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The grand opening of the Walden Galleria was 30 years ago this week, May 1, 1989, which means it’s been at least three decades since you had a draft beer or fish fry at the Leonard Post Jr. VFW Post at its longtime home at 2000 Walden Ave. The cornerstone was laid for the building in 1960 and it was open for business the following year. For the next 28 years, it was the…

Amherst

Chuck "Sully" Sullivan has a hook instead of a right hand and he can't see out of his left eye. His injuries serve as reminders of the cost of the Vietnam War on the anniversary of the last U.S. combat deaths there. But instead of discussing the enormity of what the war cost him, Sullivan prefers to talk about the politicians. He says they ordered American troops int…

History

The removal of the Sheridan Drive pedestrian bridge is stirring memories of the generations of kids who ran across the bridge in anticipation of a jump into the Delaware Pool. Sheridan Drive was built as a “super highway” in 1925, connecting Clarence, Amherst and Tonawanda to the waterfront and to Niagara Falls via Niagara Falls Boulevard. The divided highway remained m…

History

Chronicles continues a weekly look back at an illustrated map of Buffalo from 1880 and examines how the features on that map have — or haven't — changed over 138 years. Harvey & Wallace was a maker of custom carriages in Buffalo starting in 1855, and by 1878, it was the rapidly growing city’s largest and oldest manufacturer of sleighs, carriages and wagons “in a…

History

There was a time when just about every one of Buffalo’s 462 election districts had its own voting booth. In the weeks leading up to any election, city trucks would start hauling the green sheds around the city and dropping them off at the hundreds of predetermined intersections, often on the street, and causing a traffic hazard. The green painted wooden booths were a…

Buffalo

For decades, Paul R. Garland didn't tell his family that he had shielded a mother and her two children from a shower of shrapnel when he served in the Korean War. He says he never thought it merited mention. To him, he was just doing what was expected of him. But as time passed and his four children grew up, his youngest, Mark, known as the “curious one,” finally suc…

History

In the late 1880s, there were a few good years of political wrangling over which wealthy landowner was going to get to sell property to the city to build a market for the growing number of Polish immigrants in what was then the eastern stretches of the city. Walden Avenue was an early favorite, but Broadway won out, and in 1888, Buffalo’s “Polish colony” of about 3,500 had…

History

On April 19, 1995, the nation was in shock when bombs exploded at the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. A frantic scene followed, with first responders rescuing survivors and recovering the dead while law enforcement scrambled to put the pieces together. Hours after the bombing, Pendleton native Timothy McVeigh was arrested. The news that a Niagara County nat…

History

Chronicles continues a weekly look back at an illustrated map of Buffalo from 1880 and examines how the features on that map have — or haven't — changed over 138 years. Click here to explore the map. “The livestock business has come to be one of the most important, if not the most important, business now transacted in Buffalo,” read the front page of the Buffalo Morning…

History

Just after World War II ended, American Machine and Foundry moved into the former Walden Avenue plant of the Buffalo Arms Company, just east of Harlem in Cheektowaga. Almost immediately, workers there began churning out a device that would allow bowling to become one of the great American pastimes of the postwar era. AMF had been petitioning the American Bowling Cong…

Books

The plaster cast of Abraham Lincoln's face and hands at the Buffalo History Museum gives the 16th president a strangely disembodied appearance. Plaster of Paris life masks seem like an oddity today, but with photography still in its infancy, they were used in the mid-19th century to create a person's likeness. The rarely seen circa 1860 casts are among Lincoln artifa…

History

The Civil War years saw Buffalo’s Scottish population taking national pride in the ancestral sport of curling. In 1867, Buffalo’s Caledonian Curling Club joined the Grand National Curling Club of America – then North America’s “major league” for curling. Buffalonian David Bell served as the league’s first president. Traditional Scots bonspiels were held on frozen lochs.…

Buffalo

The Hotel Henry made a splash when it opened two years ago in three restored buildings on the Richardson Olmsted Campus in Buffalo. Now the time has come to figure out what to do with nine other buildings on the 42-acre site, Richardson Center Corp. officials say. They have been in ongoing discussions with interested developers and on Wednesday will publicly share po…

History

When this photo of Bailey Avenue was taken just north of Kensington Avenue in 1913, though development was on the way, it was still a mostly rural area. The residential Bailey-Kensington section first jumped on the radar with the cutting up of the Sawyer farm into city blocks in 1892. Plans for street cars and electric streetlights were made as investors were encouraged…

History

In 1921, the NFL wasn’t even known as the NFL yet. The American Professional Football Association would be renamed the “National Football League” a year later. The storyline for the league that season would become familiar to Western New York pro-football fans. The Buffalo All-Americans finished in second place to the Chicago Staleys, who would later become the Bear…