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History

When first built in the mid-1920s, the Riverside Theater on Tonawanda Street was billed as “Buffalo’s most beautiful neighborhood theater.” By 1962, Schine Enterprises, which owned the Riverside and a handful of other small movie houses, had an idea they thought could start an entertainment revolution – indoor skiing. When Ski-Dek opened in January, 1962, it was thought…

Buffalo

There's a new neighbor on one of North Buffalo's most storied streets, and already people are questioning whether it's going to be a good fit. The street is Tillinghast Place and the addition is a stone mansion, which looks like a majestic tribute to good workmanship and sophistication, according to some nearby residents, who called it a huge plus for the Parkside commu…

Buffalo

An Ohio Street restaurant will mark the anniversary of the infamous “Tewksbury Incident” at 1 p.m. Saturday. Local historian Gene Overdorf will lead the event at the Tewksbury Lodge, 249 Ohio St., with a recounting of the memorable night in January 1959 when the lake freighter Michael K. Tewksbury knocked down the Michigan Avenue bridge, destroyed businesses and created…

History

On a spot that is now a parking lot on Franklin Street, half a block south of Tupper Street, stood the Russell Bufalino Garage in the mid-1920s. That’s where Bufalino first learned the skills that the Joe Pesci character in “The Irishman” was able to use to help the Robert De Niro character get his truck and their lifelong friendship started. Long before Bufalino be…

History

Buffalo’s earliest parking ramps were built by hotels. In 1924, the Statler Hotel built the Statler Garage, north and across the street from the hotel at Delaware Avenue and Mohawk Street. Ads touted the fact that there was “nothing else like it in Buffalo.” The five-story structure held 500 cars for the convenience of hotel guests as well as patrons of nearby store…

History

It may be 227 years old, but the pipe-tomahawk that President George Washington gave to Seneca Chief Cornplanter still looks like it could chop some wood. The New York State Museum officially turned over the tomahawk to the Seneca Nation Thursday, where it will remain in the Onöhsagwë:de’ Cultural Center in Salamanca. The State Museum had the artifact from 1850 until…

History

After having spent 125 years “reaching great heights,” the Lower Main Street area was deemed a “dormant area” by the Buffalo Chamber of Commerce in 1929. [The Buffalo You Should Know: Before there was Canalside … ] Just as this week’s plan for the North Aud site were designed to part of the larger redevelopment of the whole area, the city's 1929 plans for the same ex…

History

By the time Judge Barbara Howe ordered the newsstand at Hertel and Delaware torn down in 1999, the newsstand business was a holdover from another era. “With his oversized cap, news apron and half-chewed cigar, Battaglia was a good-natured curmudgeon who was out daily in all kinds of weather to sell newspapers and magazines,” read The News obituary of Dominic Battagl…

Bills

History has long been a coaching tool for Marv Levy. He quoted Winston Churchill to his Buffalo Bills teams of the '80s and '90s. He invoked Michelangelo references and recited Scottish poetry. One time, to imprint in his players the importance of winning away games, he told an intense story about the defeat of Adolph Hitler’s evil military machine: The Nazis took…

History

Between NFL playoffs and college bowl games, chances are over the next few days and weeks, you’re bound to see a football coach or two have a big bucket of Gatorade or water dumped on his head as a part of a game-winning celebration. If your first instinct is that this traditional celebration looks more like something you’d do in anger more than triumph, you really aren…

History

Nathan Mesnekoff began operating a funeral home at 179 Richmond Ave. in 1940. Zoning issues arose as the business grew to the point where Mesnekoff was regularly holding services for two separate families in the home’s living room and dining room. While neighbors were concerned about traffic and parking, the Jewish community stood with Mesnekoff. “Rabbi Elihu Rickel …

History

With a new millennium on the horizon, the world came together. Not for hopes of peace and harmony, but in fear over a potential computer glitch that could have thrown the Western world back into the Stone Age. Computer programmers called it the Y2K bug. Especially on many older, antiquated operating systems, on Dec. 31, 1999, at 11:59:59pm, computers would flip to Ja…

History

With millions of visits from children teetering between whining about the cold and taking it all in, mouths agape, the Festival of Lights was an essential part of Western New York Christmases in the '80s. Niagara Falls, NY first flipped the switch on “A Festival of Lights” in 1981. The lights twinkled in Niagara Falls, Ont., in 1983. The Urban Renewal project that tr…

Buffalo

The 220th anniversary of the birth of Millard Fillmore, the nation's 13th president and founder of a variety of Buffalo’s cultural institutions, will be celebrated at a ceremony at 10 a.m. Jan. 7 at Forest Lawn. The University at Buffalo and the Buffalo Presidential Center are sponsoring the event, which is free and open to the public. The program will begin at Fillm…