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Arizona Democrats are vowing to fight for women’s rights after a court reinstated a law first enacted during the Civil War that bans abortion in nearly all circumstances. Democrats on Saturday looked to capitalize on an issue they hope will have a major impact on the midterm elections. Top Democrats implored women not to sit on the sidelines this year, saying the ruling sets women back  to an era when only men had the right to vote. Republican candidates have been silent since the ruling, which said the state can prosecute doctors and others who assist with an abortion unless it’s necessary to save the mother’s life.

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Saudi Arabia appears to be leaving behind the stream of negative coverage the killing of Jamal Khashoggi elicited since 2018. Once again enthusiastically welcomed back into polite and powerful society, it is no longer as frowned upon to seek their investments and accept their favor. Saudi Arabia’s busy week of triumphs included brokering a prisoner swap between Ukraine and Russia, holding a highbrow summit on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly, marking the country’s national day, hosting the German chancellor and discussing energy supply with top White House officials. The pivot is drawing focus back to the crown prince’s ambitious re-branding of Saudi Arabia and its place in the world.

A classified satellite for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office launched into orbit aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta 4 Heavy rocket on Saturday. The NROL-91 spy satellite lifted off at 3:25 p.m. from the Vandenberg Space Force Base in California’s Santa Barbara County. It was the last launch of a Delta 4 from the West Coast. Additional launches are planned from Florida before the Deltas are replaced by ULA’s next-generation Vulcan Centaur rockets. The Delta IV Heavy configuration first launched in December 2004. This was the 387th flight of a Delta rocket since 1960 and the 95th and final launch from Vandenberg.

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The CIA has revealed the scale model of the safe house where it found and killed al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahri in Afghanistan. The model is now on display at the CIA Museum, newly refurbished for the agency's 75th anniversary. Intelligence officials used the model to brief President Joe Biden in the White House Situation Room in July. The house shows several balconies, which officials used to show Biden where and how al-Zawahri liked to sit. The museum is not open to the public and generally restricted to agency employees and guests, but it allowed journalists in on Saturday to see its newest exhibits.

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Two U.S. military veterans who disappeared three months ago while fighting with Ukrainian forces have arrived in their home state of Alabama. The men were greeted Saturday by hugs and cheers at the airport in Birmingham, Alabama. Alex Drueke, and Andy Huynh had gone missing June 9 in northeastern Ukraine near the Russian border. The Alabama residents were released by Russian-backed separatists as part of a recent prisoner exchange mediated by Saudi Arabia. Also freed were five British nationals and three others — from Morocco, Sweden and Croatia. Smiling but looking tired, the two were pulled into long emotional hugs by family members before being taken to a waiting car.

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Forty years after a predominantly Black community in Warren County, North Carolina, rallied against hosting a hazardous waste landfill, President Joe Biden’s top environment official has returned to what is widely considered the birthplace of the environmental justice movement to unveil a national office that will distribute $3 billion in block grants to underserved communities burdened by pollution. Joined by civil rights leaders and participants from the 1982 protests, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Michael Regan announced Saturday that he is dedicating a new senior level of leadership to the environmental justice movement they ignited. The new Office of Environmental Justice and External Civil Rights will merge three existing EPA programs.

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Russia has told the world that it has “no choice” but to take military action in Ukraine. After days of denunciations of Russia at the prominent diplomatic gathering, Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov sought to shift the focus to Washington. His speech centered on a claim that the United States and its allies are aggressively undermining the international system that the U.N. represents. The West maintains that it's Russia doing that. Invoking history ranging from the U.S. war in Iraq in the early 2000s to the 20th-century Cold War, Lavrov portrayed the U.S. as a bully

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Kim Kardashian took Milan by storm with a a new collection she curated for Dolce & Gabbana that took inspiration from 20 years of archival looks. The designers had refused to open their archives until Kardashian proved she had the right stuff. They were convinced after she and her sisters all wore vintage Dolce & Gabbana when Kourtney Kardashian got married in Italy. Saturday was a day of debuts at Milan Fashion Week. Maximilian Davis, a 27-year-old British designer with Afro-Caribbean roots, was at the creative helm of Salvatore Ferragamo. Filipino American designer Rhuigi Villasenor led Bally as the brand returns to the runway for the first time in 20 years.

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Pharoah Sanders, the revered tenor saxophonist known to the jazz world for the spirituality of his work, has died. He was 81. His record label says Sanders died early Saturday in Los Angeles. Sanders was known for his work performing alongside John Coltrane in the 1960s. The saxophonist’s best-known work was his two-part “The Creator Has a Master Plan,” from the “Karma” album released in 1969. The combined track is nearly 33 minutes long. After more than a decade of performing but not recording albums, Sanders released the much-admired “Promises” in 2021,  with producer Floating Points and the London Symphony Orchestra.

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has declared a state of emergency across his entire state as Tropical Storm Ian gains strength over the Caribbean and is forecast to become a major hurricane in coming days. An emergency order DeSantis initially issued for just two dozen counties was expanded to a statewide warning on Saturday. The governor is encouraging residents and localities to prepare for the storm, which could lash large swaths of Florida. The National Hurricane Center said Ian is forecast to rapidly power up to a hurricane by Sunday and a major hurricane by late Monday or early Tuesday. It's expected to move over western Cuba before approaching Florida in the middle of next week.

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India’s foreign minister laid out the country’s plans for its turn at the G-20 presidency during the U.N General Assembly. India assumes the mantle of the consortium of leading developed and developing nations in December. Subramanyam Jaishankar said India’s approach would be “based on principles of mutual respect and national ownership with a commitment to sustainable development for all.” While India has expressed concerns over Russia’s war in Ukraine, the South Asian country has maintained a neutral stance, refusing to abrogate business ties with Russia and join Western sanctions. He called for constructive dialogue, diplomacy and action to resolve the conflict for the sake of all.

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China has underscored its commitment to its claim on Taiwan. Its foreign minister told world leaders that anyone who gets in the way of its determination to reunify with the self-governing island would be “crushed by the wheels of history.” The language was forceful but well within the realm of normal for Chinese leadership. China vehemently defends its claim on Taiwan. The island separated from the mainland after a 1949 civil war and now functions with its own government. A recent visit to Taiwan by the speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives markedly ratcheted up tensions between Washington and Beijing.

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Polish media are reporting that Pink Floyd co-founder Roger Waters has canceled concerts planned in Poland amid outrage over his stance on Russia’s war against Ukraine. An official with the concert arena in Krakow where Waters had been scheduled to perform in April said the musician's manager had withdrawn the April performances without giving a reason. City councilors in Krakow were expected to vote next week on a proposal to name Waters as a persona non grata. Waters wrote an open letter to Ukraine's first lady this month in which he blamed “extreme nationalists” in Ukraine for having “set your country on the path to this disastrous war.” He also criticized the West.

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European Union candidate Serbia has signed an agreement with Russia to hold mutual “consultations” on foreign policy matters. Serbian Foreign Affairs Minister Nikola Selakovic signed the agreement with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov on the margins of the U.N. General Assembly. Although the Serbian government says it supports Ukraine’s territorial integrity, it has refused to join Western sanctions against its Slavic allies in Moscow. Aligning foreign policies with the EU is one of the main pre-conditions for joining the 27-nation bloc. Officials from Serbia’s pro-Western opposition said the deal signed Friday is a sign President Aleksander Vucic has given up on EU membership and is bringing his country closer into Moscow’s fold.

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A soldier from Massachusetts who went missing during the Korean war and was later reported to have died in a prisoner of war camp has been accounted for. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says Army Cpl. Joseph J. Puopolo, of East Boston, was just 19 when he was reported missing in December 1950. It was later reported he had died in a prisoner of war camp. Military officials say remains disinterred in 2019 were identified as Puopolo through dental and anthropological analysis, mitochondrial DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence. Puopolo's grandnephew says his family, including the soldier's sister who is now 99 years old, has not forgotten him.

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How will American leaders and their allies respond if President Vladimir Putin seeks to escalate his way out of his bad situation on Ukraine’s battlefields? Putin this week renewed threats of claiming more Ukrainian territory, and even using nuclear weapons. U.S. and European leaders have made clear they will try to double down on the same tactics that have helped put Russia in a corner in Ukraine. That means more financial penalties and international isolation for Russia, more arms and other backing for Ukraine. There’s no sign of the United States and NATO matching Putin’s intensified nuclear threats with the same bluster, which could raise the risks of escalating the conflict.

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Russian police have moved quickly to disperse peaceful protests against President Vladimir Putin’s military mobilization order. An independent website that monitors political arrests in Russia said police detained nearly 750 people on Saturday, including over 370 in Moscow and some 150 in St. Petersburg. OVD-Info said some of the arrested individuals were children. The demonstrations followed protests that erupted within hours Wednesday after Putin, in a move to beef up his volunteer forces fighting in Ukraine, announced a call-up of experienced and skilled army reservists. In Moscow, a heavy contingent of police roamed a downtown area where a protest was planned and checked the IDs of passersby. Officers rounded up those they deemed suspicious.

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“The Crown” will return to its Netflix throne in early November. The streaming service says the series about Queen Elizabeth II and her family circle will begin its fifth season on Nov. 9. The debut will come two months after the queen’s Sept. 8 death at 96. Production on the sixth season was suspended on the day of the queen’s death and again for the funeral of Britain’s longest-serving monarch. In the upcoming season, Imelda Staunton is the latest in a succession of actors who have played the queen. The role of Princess Diana will be filled by Elizabeth Debicki of the film “Tenet.”

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Mali's prime minister is lashing out at everyone from the U.N. secretary-general to former colonizer France. In a speech before the U.N. General Assembly, Prime Minister Abdoulaye Maiga took aim at what he called a “French junta.” He says that Mali was “stabbed in the back” last year when France made the unilateral decision to relocate its troops to Niger. The last French troops departed Malian soil in August after months of deteriorating relations with the two-time coup leader who holds power in Bamako. Maiga, a lieutenant colonel in the army, also said that the U.N. peacekeeping mission known as MINUSMA, has failed to achieve its objectives nearly 10 years later.

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Some Oregon parks officials say high demand for crowded campsites is leading to arguments, fistfights and even so-called campsite pirates. The Statesman Journal reports that park rangers have sometimes had to play mediator and detective when disputes break out over reserved and first-come, first-served campsites. In some cases, would-be campers will remove a reservation card from a reserved site and replace it with their own. Brian Carroll with Linn County Parks and Recreation says in a few cases people have even thrown punches in disputes at Sunnyside County Park. The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department has said it will seek legislation to give rangers added protection amid increasing harassment on the job.

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So you’re paying attention to the tectonic geopolitical issues at the U.N. General Assembly, and most of them are addressed in carefully calibrated and crafted diplomatic language. Then, suddenly, someone like Ralph Gonsalves steps up to the podium. In an ocean of speakers from around the world, the prime minister of St. Vincent and the Grenadines stood out with his use of metaphor and imagery. One sample: “Trying to go up a fast-moving down escalator is a challenging exercise.” Gonsalves is no stranger to summoning eloquence for political effect at the United Nations. Last year, he issued a clarion call after a volcanic eruption in his country displaced 20,000 people.

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New York City officials are appealing a judge’s ruling that they lacked the legal authority to fire members of the city’s largest police union for violating a COVID-19 vaccination mandate. State Supreme Court Judge Lyle Frank in Manhattan ruled Friday that the city health department’s vaccine mandate couldn’t be used to fire or put on leave members of the Police Benevolent Association. Frank ordered the reinstatement of union members who were “wrongfully” terminated or put on unpaid leave for refusing to get vaccinated. The city immediately filed a notice of appeal, freezing the judge’s decision until the appeal is heard.

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A breach of sensitive voting equipment data from a rural county in Georgia spilled into the public light last month when documents and emails produced in response to subpoenas revealed the involvement of high-profile supporters of former President Donald Trump. Since then, a series of revelations about what happened in Coffee County have raised questions about whether the Dominion Voting Systems machines used throughout Georgia have been compromised. The tale involves a bail bondsman, a prominent attorney tied to Trump and a cast of characters from an area that rarely draws notice from outsiders.

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