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John Davis, real Milli Vanilli singer, dies at 66 of COVID-19
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John Davis, real Milli Vanilli singer, dies at 66 of COVID-19

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John Davis, one of the true singers behind notorious R&B act Milli Vanilli, has died of coronavirus at age 66, according to his family.

Davis' daughter, Jasmin Davis, confirmed the performer's death to CNN Thursday.

She revealed the news initially in a post shared on his Facebook page this week.

"Unfortunately my dad passed away this evening through the coronavirus," she wrote on Monday.

"He made a lot of people happy with his laughter and smile, his happy spirit, love and especially through his music. He gave so much to the world! Please give him the last round of applause."

John Davis

John Davis was one of the true singers behind notorious musical act Milli Vanilli.

Milli Vanilli was a German-French act fronted by Rob Pilatus and Fab Morvan. The group fell apart after it emerged that the men had not sung on their records.

The real singing was done by vocalists behind the scenes, including Davis.

The musical duo won the 1989 Grammy for best new artist but lost the award after the truth emerged.

Davis continued with his musical career after the scandal, this time as a lead performer. He sang with stars such as Luther Vandross and performed at concerts around the world. Davis also composed film music.

The musician, who was born in South Carolina, later moved to Germany, where he made occasional television appearances.

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