Share this article

print logo

Ted Hadley


Theater

The late and acerbic George Jean Nathan, a 1920’s drama critic and editor – a colleague and friend of H.L. Mencken - was once asked about his definition of theater. “I think,” famously replied Nathan, “that theater is what literature does at night.” At the conclusion of Red Thread Theatre’s first performance of its season-opening play, “Louisiana Bacchae,” I silently agre…

Theater

The late and acerbic George Jean Nathan, a 1920’s drama critic and editor – a colleague and friend of H.L. Mencken - was once asked about his definition of theater. “I think,” famously replied Nathan, “that theater is what literature does at night.” At the conclusion of Red Thread Theatre’s first performance of its season-opening play, “Louisiana Bacchae,” I silently ag…

Featured

In the program notes for its latest stage production, the vintage Broadway musical “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum,” Lancaster Opera House’s artistic director David Bondrow quotes amazing statistics to help celebrate the venerable old relic’s 35th anniversary: 1,000-plus shows and one million playgoers.Impressive. And “Forum,” written in the mid-1960s by B…

Featured

Antonin Cimolino, the Stratford (Ontario) Festival artistic director, describing his 2016 play choices, has said this about his themes: “No defeat can be more devastating than the vanquishing of the spirit; no victory more exhilarating than the triumph of the heart.” Succinctly, that is the 2016 Stratford season in a nutshell.Here are brief reviews of four plays currently …

Featured

The late, great classical actress Dame Judith Anderson once said about the theater that “When the lights go down, the pulse goes up.” It’s apt, for actors and audiences alike.Anderson’s belief fits Canada’s famed international Stratford Festival perfectly, particularly for its new season – 13 plays in four theaters in this western Ontario village through late October. Some…

Somewhere on our planet – maybe beyond, who knows? – a production of Ken Ludwig’s run-amok farce, “Lend Me a Tenor” is in rehearsal or already up and running. The play has remained immensely popular since it bowed in London in 1986. It later moved to Broadway – where then New York Times drama critic Frank Rich dubbed it “painless fluff” – and walked off with a passel of a…

Somewhere on our planet – maybe beyond, who knows? – a production of Ken Ludwig’s run-amok farce, “Lend Me a Tenor” is in rehearsal or already up and running. The play has remained immensely popular since it bowed in London in 1986. It later moved to Broadway – where then New York Times drama critic Frank Rich dubbed it “painless fluff” – and walked off with a passel of a…

Featured

Gary Earl Ross is a man of many letters, a skill set that includes great prowess as a playwright. He’s gaining national renown and his recent anti-war work, “The Guns of Christmas,” continues to be lauded. Despite this recent success, Ross has discovered that getting plays produced is no easy task and he was stunned to discover that the writing of “The Mark of Cain,” a fi…

Featured

Gary Earl Ross is a man of many letters, a skill set that includes great prowess as a playwright. He’s gaining national renown and his recent anti-war work, “The Guns of Christmas,” continues to be lauded. Despite this recent success, Ross has discovered that getting plays produced is no easy task and he was stunned to discover that the writing of “The Mark of Cain,” a fi…

Matthew LaChiusa’s peripatetic acting troupe, American Repertory Theater of WNY – ART of WNY, to its clientele – has found new quarters, thanks to the visionary Sportsmens Americana Music Foundation. The community education group sees a collaboration between its music programs, existing and planned, and theater. The new stage, in Black Rock, is called the 330 Theater, nex…

Featured

As is their custom, Road Less Traveled Productions has assembled a pamphlet loaded with facts about the themes surrounding a work on its stage, in this case, “Safe,” the latest play by the company’s unofficial playwright-in-residence, Donna Hoke. RLTP dramaturge Katie Mallinson puts together facts and figures, theories and commentary about a play’s theme. The information …

You could certainly argue the case that “Bad Jews,” by the lauded young playwright, Joshua Harmon – currently one of the most performed plays in America and internationally – is, or perceived to be, offensive. Saul Golubcow, writing in Washington Jewish Week, suggested, tongue firmly in cheek, that maybe “Jews Behaving Badly” or “Not So Good” or even “Could Be Better” woul…

Featured

The Alleyway Theatre, for 36 years, has produced new plays - original works, world premiere stuff. Fledgling playwrights from all over the country send scripts to the company impresario, Neal Radice, founder, proprietor, along with his wife and partner, the indefatigable Joyce Stilson. An average year might bring hundreds of one-act or full-length plays to their door. Radi…

Featured

The Alleyway Theatre, for 36 years, has produced new plays - original works, world premiere stuff. Fledgling playwrights from all over the country send scripts to the company impresario, Neal Radice, founder, proprietor, along with his wife and partner, the indefatigable Joyce Stilson. An average year might bring hundreds of one-act or full-length plays to their door. Radi…

As is often the case, the ancient Greeks had a word for it.“Hamartia:” a character trait that inexorably leads a person to their downfall. A “tragic flaw.” Literature and the theater are full of examples, from Achilles to Hamlet and back.Joe Keller, the protagonist in the late Arthur Miller’s still impactful play, 1947’s “All My Sons,” could be the poster boy for hamartia.…