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Editorial: It seems to us — a non-endorsement and a generous booster

Labor Day weekend means the summer campaign is over and it’s time to make a choice in Decision 2018: Who should start at quarterback for the Buffalo Bills?

To quote the waffling character Greg Marmalard in the movie "Animal House": They're each outstanding in their own way.

AJ McCarron, the veteran from Cincinnati, has looked so-so in preseason, though he did lead a comeback win on Thursday night in Chicago. Nathan Peterman is a second-year player who has performed fairly well in preseason games. Josh Allen, of course, is the anointed QB of the Future, the seventh overall pick in this year's draft. The Bills are counting on his passing arm to be too big to fail.

The News' political endorsements for this month's primary elections will begin appearing on Tuesday. Making those selections was much less contentious for the editorial board than trying to agree on a quarterback.

Rather than let the issue tear our board asunder, we've decided to punt. Let the games begin — this Thursday — and may the best man win the job. Which man is that? To use that great journalism cliché: Only time will tell.

One of the coolest public projects — and by public, we really mean public — to come along in years will soon get underway in Buffalo thanks in part to a generous private-sector sponsor: David Rogers, Buffalo booster, history buff and company CEO.

Rogers, who founded and heads Life Storage, a local self-storage company, has agreed to foot the entire cost of building a replica of the 73-foot-long packet boat that was used to mark the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825. The cost: $325,000.

Rogers calls this being "sort of a boat guy."

The project, floated by the Buffalo maritime Center, will include volunteers from the community who will help to build the boat and learn skills at the same time. New York State has agreed to pay the $4 million cost to raise a building at Canalside to house the endeavor.

It's a fantastic project that marks the canal's bicentennial and helps celebrate the city as it was then and as it exists now. The state's assistance is genuinely appreciated, but Rogers' gift goes above and beyond.

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