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BreadHive's West Side cafe opens next week

Worker-owned bakery BreadHive will open its West Side café on June 21.

The café, at 402 Connecticut St., will offer sandwiches, light fare and sweet baked goods in addition to BreadHive’s established lineup of bread, bagels, granola and pretzels. It will offer about 20 seats.

Sandwiches will range from meaty (pastrami with Swiss, sauce, kraut and pickles, $9.50) to vegan (grilled seitan, barbecue sauce, pickles, slaw, $10). Pickles and kraut will be from Barrel + Brine.

Sides ($3-$5) will include vegan lentil soup, farro salad, and First Light yogurt fruit parfaits.

Pastries ($2-$5) will include salted chocolate rye and vegan triple ginger molasses cookies, lemon poppy poundcake, and sourdough fruit scones.

BreadHive owners, from left to right: Allison Ewing, Valerie Rettberg-Smith, Emily Stewart. (Photo: Chris Pierce McCleary)

BreadHive owners, from left to right: Allison Ewing, Valerie Rettberg-Smith, Emily Stewart. (Photo: Chris Pierce McCleary)

[Read: BreadHive's prank among best April Fools jokes in Buffalo]

On tap will be hopped sparkling lemonade and other carbonated drinks from Community Beer Works, and kombucha, said Valerie Rettberg-Smith, an owner.

Hours will be 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays, closed Mondays. Phone: 980-5623 (980-LOAF).

Breadhive is a worker-owned business, with five partners at the core of its workforce. It was established at 123 Baynes St. in 2014. The largest segment of financing for the new place was $40,000 in shares bought by customers, each $1,000 share bringing investors a one-year bread subscription and a 3 percent return.

The cafe was opened with $40,000 in investments from BreadHive customers. (Photo: Allison Ewing)

The cafe was opened with $40,000 in investments from BreadHive customers. (Photo: Allison Ewing)

“The biggest piece of the pie came from Western New York investors,” said owner Allison Ewing. Some had already invested in the bakery’s first round of shares, which allowed it to open debt-free in 2014.

“It’s a real motivator,” Ewing said. “You’re in the middle of a day, work can be stressful, and you say, ‘Why am I doing this?’ Well, I know the name and face of everyone who has invested in my business, and I don’t want to let those people down.”

Send restaurant news to agalarneau@buffnews.com

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