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The 10: Prom of the Dead, Mat Kearney, Haunted Food Truck Rodeo

1) Prom of the Dead: Candyland, 9 p.m. Oct. 24 at the DNIPRO Ukrainian Cultural Center (562 Genesee St.). Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 at the door. 18+ are admitted, 21+ to drink.

Commentary: It's a perfect time of year for costumed dance parties, and Prom of the Dead -- an annual event presented by Torn Space Theater -- rarely fails to impress. An hour of free alcohol from 9 to 10 p.m. gets Saturday night rolling quickly in the cavernous Ukrainian Center, and as you can see from the Facebook event page, the Candyland theme -- replete with technicolor lights -- will get weirder and weirder as the night progresses. No word whether or not Gramma Nutt will serve as a guest DJ.

An image from 2014's Prom of the Dead party at the Ukrainian Center. (Don Nieman/Special to The News)

An image from 2014's Prom of the Dead party at the Ukrainian Center. (Don Nieman/Special to The News)

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2) Mat Kearney, 7 p.m. Oct. 24 in Town Ballroom (681 S. Main St.). Tickets range between $24 and $26.

Commentary: After listening to recent releases by Kearney, it's easier to connect his music with inspiration from the Wu-Tang Clan -- he's a lot deeper than his sophomore album "Nothing Left to Lose," which broke out in part due to singles played on "Grey's Anatomy."

I'm partial to Kearney because of his soccer-playing background, but credit him for creative projects like filming "Heartbeat" in one take on a camera-bound drone. For more on the show, read Kris Kielich's detailed interview.

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3) Haunted Food Truck Rodeo, 4 to 8 p.m. Oct. 23 at Iron Island Museum (998 E. Lovejoy St.) Free to attend, although you can purchased a haunted museum tour for $5.

Commentary: One tip -- don't wear a costume that covers your mouth, as the array of food available will tempt anyone. Find the full list of food trucks in attendance here, but two relatively new vendors -- Antone's at the Fair and O.G. Wood Fire Pizza -- are expected to be on the premises. Face painting, three psychics and $5 Iron Island Museum tours are additional draws to work up your appetite. Check out Buffalo.com's gallery from last year's Haunted Food Truck Rodeo.

The creepiness of the Iron Island Museum is offset by the food trucks in the background. (Don Nieman/Special to The News)

The creepiness of the Iron Island Museum is offset by the food trucks in the background. (Don Nieman/Special to The News)

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4) Neon Indian, 8 p.m. Oct. 23 at Tralf Music Hall (622 Main St.) Tickets are $17 in advance or $19 at the door.

Commentary: It sure seems like Alex Palomo, whose project Neon Indian last stopped in Buffalo in 2010, made a wise move separating himself from the chillwave movement, which could be the most filtered genre possible [Grantland's take on it is pretty funny]. His "Slumlord Rising" proves that his new sound has been accepted; the YouTube video (embedded below) has around 35,000 views in three days. Read about and listen to some of Palomo's work in Mac McGuire's preview, then learn a little more about local opener Lesionread.

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5) A Nightmare on Elmwood: A Victorian Horror, 8 p.m. Oct. 23 to 2 a.m. Oct. 24 at Nickel City Housing Cooperative (208 North St., very close to Elmwood Avenue). $5 with a costume, $7 without. Proceeds help send tenants to the NASCO Institute, a Chicago base of idea-sharing for the cooperative movement.

Commentary: I didn't realize that I'd been to this before, but I've been to this before. The dark mansion does exude a creepy aura -- there are so many rooms! -- and you never know when you'll turn a corner too quickly and run smack into a scantily clad ghoul. There are DJs, a performance by the Scajaquada Creeps and even mummy wrapping, which I'm sure some people enjoy.

Members of the Nickel City Housing Cooperative gather around the dinner table in 2007, which was a long time ago. (Robert Kirkham/Buffalo News file photo)

Members of the Nickel City Housing Cooperative gather around the dinner table in 2007, which was a long time ago. (Robert Kirkham/Buffalo News file photo)

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6) Title Fight, Alex G. and The Traditional, 7 p.m. Oct. 23 in Waiting Room (334 Delaware Ave.). Tickets range from $15 to $17.

Commentary: A very solid three-pronged show comes to downtown Buffalo Friday, as hardcore-turned-shoegazers Title Fight, Bandcamp sensation Alex G. and Queen City regulars The Traditional fill a diverse bill. Who said every set has to sound similar? Read Kris Kielich's preview of Title Fight, and then listen to some Alex G. on Bandcamp, below.

Beach Music by Alex G

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7) Buffalo Fashion Show, 6 p.m. doors, show from 7:15 to 9 p.m. Oct. 23 in Hotel @ the Lafayette (391 Washington St.) Tickets are $50 general admission or $100 for VIP, while students can still get in for $30.

Commentary: Large-scale Buffalo fashion events have been hard to come by recently, but local designer Steven Bales, of Pandamonium, is committed to not letting runway events die. The setting is terrific at the glamorous Hotel @ the Lafayette downtown, and the fashions are diverse -- wearable art by Ashley Kay, Urbanwear, pieces from the designers at Buffalo State College and even some of Vera Bradley's collection.

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8) Giuseppe Panza's "Looking at Tomorrow: Light and Language from the Panza Collection," 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 24 and 25 in the Albright-Knox Art Gallery (1285 Elmwood Ave.) Note that general admission rates have been cut in half as the gallery installs several new exhibitions. Entry costs can be found here.

Commentary: How can minimalist art be so complex? Sure, Panza's curation -- like Joseph Kosuth's take on the dictionary definition of "nothing" below, presented in white on a black background -- is noteworthy for the sheer fact that "nothing" as a concept is actually something. My brain is starting to hurt, so read Colin Dabkowski's more lucid explanation of what Giuseppe Panza is achieving through light, space and language.

Joseph Kosuth's "(Titled) Art as Idea as Idea," is part of "Looking at Tomorrow" in the Albright-Knox Art Gallery.

Joseph Kosuth's "(Titled) Art as Idea as Idea," is part of "Looking at Tomorrow" in the Albright-Knox Art Gallery.

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9) STS9, 7 p.m. Oct. 25 in Town Ballroom (681 S. Main St.) Tickets range between $27.50 and $30.

Commentary: STS9 is short for Sound Tribe Sector 9, which admittedly is a bit of a mouthful. The five-piece describes its genre as "post-rock dance music," which is basically electronic dance music canoodling with jam-band music. One aspect to look forward to: the works of lighting designer Saxton Waller.

Read this from HeyReverb.com: "Waller’s geometric creations truly lifted the music to new heights. His movers created vertical pillars of light that surrounded the band, splashed patterns across the rock behind the stage and repeatedly returned to his signature ROYGBIV color spectrum amid a sea of fog."

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10) The Struts, 8 p.m. Oct. 26 at Buffalo Iron Works (49 Illinois St.) Tickets run for $10 and can only be purchased at the door.

Commentary: Casually sneaking a Monday event in The 10, but The Struts are an English band in the same vein as The Darkness, with showmanship and attitude (without the shrill melodies). Luke Spiller -- no relation to former Bill C.J. -- and his band will drop by the Cobblestone District to pull from their 2014 debut album, "Everybody Wants." You've probably heard "Could Have Been Me," below.

Email Ben Tsujimoto, who will now regularly fling around terms like "shoegazer" and "chillwave," at btsujimoto@buffnews.com

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