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It’s time for the annual Nichols School General Information Test

Test your knowledge with Nichols School’s 2015 Lucy and Sherman Maisel General Information Test.

The test is a tradition that began in the 1911 Nichols School yearbook. It is compiled from questions submitted by Nichols faculty and is given to students in grades 9 through 12 as a measure of general knowledge.

Answers will be posted online Friday at 9 a.m.

1. Who was the first New York State politician to be elected president of the United States?

Aaron Burr

Alexander Hamilton

Martin Van Buren

Millard Fillmore

James Garfield

2. The last Major League Baseball player to achieve a batting average of .400 or better, did it in 1941. Name him.

Ty Cobb

Joe DiMaggio

Lou Gehrig

Stan Musial

Ted Williams

3. The capital of Australia is the only one of these major cities with a population of less than 1 million. It is ______________.

Adelaide

Canberra

Melbourne

Perth

Sydney

4. “Major Strasser has been shot. Round up the usual suspects.” These lines occur near the end of the classic World War II movie _______________.

5. Which of these great German musicians composed “The Brandenburg Concertos”?

J.S. Bach

Beethoven

Handel

Mozart

Tellemann

6. Which of these words is farthest in meaning from “phlegmatic”?

Caustic

Croupy

Earnest

Quiscent

Voluble

7. Former N.Y. governor and secretary of state to Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson, _________ __________, also negotiated the U.S. purchase of Alaska.

Salmon Chase

William Seward

Samuel Tilden

Thurlow Weed

8. How many syllables does a poetic line of anapestic tetrameter contain?

6

8

10

12

14

9. With what art form was Isadora Duncan most closely associated?

Choral Music

Dance

Painting

Sculpture

Theater

10. The mythical town of Lake Wobegon featured in Garrison Keillor’s “Prairie Home Companion” is located in what state?

Iowa

Michigan

Minnesota

Kansas

Wisconsin

11. Woodrow Wilson (Princeton) was the first university president to be elected president of the U.S. Who was the second?

William Howard Taft

Calvin Coolidge

Herbert Hoover

Dwight Eisenhower

Richard Nixon

12. The 18th was the only amendment to the U.S. Constitution to later be repealed. What did that amendment prohibit (sale and distribution of)?

13. Protestants constitute the largest religious denomination in the U.S. How many Protestants are on our current Supreme Court?

14. Which Texas city lies directly across the Rio Grande from the Mexican city of Ciudad Juarez?

Brownsville

Corpus Christie

Del Rio

El Paso

15. What famous Broadway musical was based upon the Greek myth of Pygmalion, about a sculptor who falls in love with the female statue he has created? (Hint: George Bernard Shaw did another nonmusical version of Pygmalion for the stage).

“Brigadoon”

“Carousel”

“My Fair Lady”

“Paint Your Wagon”

16. _________________ the Confessor (1004-1066), later canonized by the Catholic Church, is an offstage figure discussed in Shakespeare’s “Macbeth.” He immediately preceded William the Conqueror. Fill in the blank.

17. Oscar Wilde’s most famous (and hilarious) comedy is titled “The Importance of Being ____________.”

18. Fe is the chemical symbol for what metal?

19. With what country is the folk song/ballad “Waltzing Matilda” associated?

20. The Orkney Islands are located directly to the north of what European country?

Denmark

Ireland

Norway

Scotland

Sweden

21. What is the present day name of the great historical city formerly known as Byzantium and later as Constantinople?

22. Polyphemos was the name of the gigantic ______________ who confined Odysseus to a cave, until the hero was able to escape by blinding the monster.

23. “Crime and Punishment,” Fyodor Dostoevsky’s great novel of murder and redemption, is set in what northern Russian city founded by Peter the Great?

Arcangel

Kiev

Moscow

St. Petersburg

24. A Gila Monster, found in the desert regions of the U.S. Southwest, is a poisonous species of _____________.

25. What great American actor won two Academy Awards for “On the Waterfront” (1954) and “The Godfather” (1972)?

26. The father of Homer’s Odysseus and the brother of Shakespeare’s Ophelia share the same name of __________.

27. On what Mediterranean island is the volcano Mount Etna located?

Corsica

Crete

Malta

Sicily

28. What flamboyant American Cavalry general was slain in a battle against Plains Indians at Little Big Horn in Montana in 1876?

29. In what upstate New York town is Colgate University located?

Auburn

Hamilton

Herkimer

Rome

Utica

30. Atticus Finch is the lawyer-hero of what widely read Southern novel?

31. Name the author of the novel in question 30.

Harper Lee

Margaret Mitchell

Toni Morrison

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

32. Antonia Shimerda, the heroine of Willa Cather’s classic novel of immigrant life, is of what nationality?

Austrian

Bohemian

Hungarian

Italian

Sicilian

33. 2015 is the 100th anniversary of the birth of the greatest (in the opinion of the compiler of this test) singer of popular songs in the 20th century. Name him.

Fred Astaire

Bing Crosby

Cole Porter

Frank Sinatra

34. “All the News That’s Fit to Print” has been for at least a century the motto of what newspaper?

Farmer’s Almanac

New York Times

Police Gazette

Wall Street Journal

35. Which of these words is closest in meaning to puerile?

Alert

Foolish

Precocious

Swollen

36. The Punic Wars pitted ancient Rome against __________________.

Carthage

Egypt

Greece

Persia

Turkey

37. “Muckdogs” is the colorful nickname of the minor league baseball team representing what Western New York city?

Batavia

Canandaigua

Fredonia

Olean

Wellsville

38. The “Whaling Capital” of the 19th century United States, and the site of the U.S. Whaling Museum is this eastern Massachusetts town.

Andover

Lawrence

Lowell

New Bedford

Waltham

39. Abraham Lincoln’s first term vice president (whom he replaced with Andrew Johnson of Tennessee) was a Maine Republican with Abolitionist sympathies named Hannibal _____________.

Allen

Barker

Clough

Fessenden

Hamlin

40. Name the whaling vessel on which Ishmael, the narrator and his “blood brother,” Queequeg, the South Sea Islander, and first harpooner, ship out.

King Philip

Pequod

Squanto

Tashtego

41. “Call me __________” may be the most well-known opening sentence in any American novel. It is spoken by the narrator and only survivor of the fatal voyage. Name him.

42. Which of these 19th century U.S. presidents was the only one to serve two (2) terms?

John Adams

John Quincy Adams

Andrew Jackson

Martin Van Buren

James K. Polk

43. A tern is a bird most similar to a __________.

Gull

Hawk

Pigeon

Raven

Woodpecker

44. What part of the anatomy is the gauntlet designed to protect?

Foot

Leg

Ribs

Hand

Shoulder

45. With what Greek deity is the Roman god Mercury identified?

Apollo

Haephestus

Hermes

Poseidon

46. Which of these tongues is not a part of the Semitic language family?

Arabic

Ethiopian

Hebrew

Phoenician

Turkish

47. Vermont’s junior senator was elected mayor of Burlington and Vermont congressman as a Socialist. Now he is an Independent. Name him.

Patrick Leahy

Bill McKibben

Bernie Sanders

Peter Welch

48. By what name is the Georgian radical politician, Josef Djugashvili, known to history?

49. Which bodily organ may be afflicted with myopia?

50. “Tam O’Shanter,” an extravagant 200-line comic ballad, is a masterpiece of Scotland’s national poet, Robert ______________.

51. In what field did Italy’s Federico Fellini become successful and famous?

Biology

Choral Music

Films

Politics

Soap Operas

52. Which Ivy League university has the “Whiffenpoof Song” as a theme?

Brown

Columbia

Harvard

Princeton

Yale

53. What Fascist dictator of Italy (a World War II ally of Hitler) was executed by his own people in 1945?

54. “Rhapsody in Blue” and “An American in Paris” were two of the most popular works by the American Composer, George ____________.

55. What was the religious affiliation of William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania?

56. Catherine the Great, empress of Russia from 1762–1794 was ___________-born rather than Russian.

English

French

German

Italian

Polish

57. Managua is the capital city of which Central American country?

Costa Rica

Guatamala

Honduras

Nicaragua

Panama

58. Barbara Mikulski, who just announced her forthcoming retirement, is the longest serving female senator. What state does she represent?

California

Maine

Maryland

Nebraska

New Mexico

59. What religious organization was founded in 19th century England by William Booth?

60. In the Old Testament who was Ruth’s mother-in-law?

Esther

Naomi

Rachel

Rebecca

Sarah

61. What is the name of the “rare and radiant maiden” whom the narrator of Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Raven” will see “Nevermore?”

62. Which of these dynasties ruled China from 1348 to 1644?

Han

Manchu

Ming

Sung

T’ang

63. By what more familiar name is the Civil War battle of Manassas known?

Antietam

Bull Run

Chattanooga

Red River

Shiloh

64. Which of the United States has the largest percentage of its land area covered with forests?

Maine

Michigan

Minnesota

Oregon

Washington

65. Which of these Canadian provinces lies furthest west?

British Columbia

Manitoba

Nanavut

Saskatchewan

66. Which of these 19th century English novels was not written by Jane Austen?

“Pride and Prejudice”

“Emma”

“Mansfield Park”

“Middlemarch”

“Sense and Sensibility”

67. What is the collective name for the first 10 Amendments to the Constitution of the United States?

68. The recently deceased Rev. Theodore Hesburgh was longtime president of what Catholic university?

69. What is the world’s tallest quadruped?

70. Which of these illustrious 20th century American novelists did not win the Nobel Prize for literature?

William Faulkner

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Ernest Hemingway

Toni Morrison

John Steinbeck

71. Founded by Mother Ann Lee in 1782, this celibate religious community was noted for its fine craftsmanship in furniture.

Dunkers

Millerites

Quakers

Shakers

Whoopers

72. In the early 20th century, when poverty was rife and hobos and panhandlers “rode the nails,” they dreamed of an earthly paradise “Where the cops have wooden legs/The bulldogs all have rubber teeth,/And the hens lay softboiled eggs …” This paradise was called “The big _______ ________ mountain.”

73. Dr. John Watson was the admiring companion of what renowned fictional detective?

74. Of what Central European country did Vaclav Havel become president?

Austria

Czechoslovakia

Hungary

Poland

Romania

75. What product made the Vermont entrepreneurs Ben and Jerry rich?

76. Three of the most powerful and influential Americans of the mid-19th century were James Gordon Bennet, Horace Greeley and Henry J. Raymond. In what area did they achieve fame and power?

77. What recently deceased great American actress played the poet Emily Dickinson in the one- woman play, “The Belle of Amherst?”

78. Two of the greatest female roles in the history of American cinema, Scarlett O’Hara in “Gone With the Wind” and Blanche DuBois in “A Streetcar Named Desire” were played by this British actress.

Wendy Hiller

Gypsy Rose Lee

Vivian Leigh

Helen Mirren

79. Harper’s Ferry in Virginia was the site of ________ _________’s unsuccessful attempt to organize a slave uprising against the Confederacy.

80. Symphony #8 (“The Unfinished”) was one of the many musical masterpieces of this German genius who died at 31.

Beethoven

Max Bruch

Mozart

Franz Schubert

81. Even though he amassed more base hits (4,256) than any other Major League Baseball player, he is ineligible for the Hall of Fame because he bet on his own team to win games. Name him.

Ty Cobb

Rogers Hornsby

Pete Rose

Carl Yastrzemski

82. An archipelago is a cluster of many __________.

Islands

Lakes

Mountains

Stars

83. Born in Scotland, he died young (44) in Samoa in the South Seas, one of the most widely read and beloved writers in the world, author of “Treasure Island” and “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.” He is Robert Louis __________.

84. Which of these natural phenomena best characterizes a savanna?

Grass

Hills

Ice

Trees

Wetlands

85. The ___________ War was a name given to the period of hostility between Great Britain and China between 1839 and 1842.

86. Who was the first king of Israel?

Ahab

David

Samuel

Saul

Solomon

87. Which English poet created “The Wife of Bath”?

Byron

Chaucer

Marlowe

Milton

Shakespeare

88. Buster weighs 215 pounds. His opponent, Bruiser, weighs 15 stone. Who is the heavier, and by how much?

89. Gloria is a svelte 126 pounds; Prudence is a trim 8½ stone. Which of these ladies is lighter, and by how much?

90. Which of these is not a saltwater fish?

Cod

Haddock

Mackerel

Pickerel

Scrod

91. The Royal Road from Susa to Sadis was the major highway for what ancient empire?

Egyptian

Greek

Macedonian

Persian

Roman

92. Name the composer of the oratorio, “Messiah.”

Bach

Handel

Mozart

Haydn

93. How many feet are in a line of hexameter poetry?

94. 2015 is the 100th anniversary of the sinking of this ocean liner by German U-boats.

95. What were the next two states admitted to the Union after the 13 original colonies? (half credit possible)

Florida

Illinois

Kentucky

Michigan

Vermont

96. What was the original name of the U.S. Cabinet post now known as secretary of defense? (It was changed in 1946).

97. What two popular and charismatic American film actors teamed up for “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” and “The Sting”?

98. What turn-of-the-century (20th) African-American composer provided the musical score for “The Sting”?

99. Frances Perkins became the first female U.S. Cabinet member in 1932 when Franklin Roosevelt named her as secretary of __________.

100. Today there are three Jewish members of the U.S. Supreme Court. There were none from 1790 to 1916 when Woodrow Wilson appointed this illustrious legal scholar, Louis D. ___________. (Hint: There is a prominent New England University named after him).