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Gibb has colorectal cancer

Bee Gees star Robin Gibb has advanced colorectal cancer and remains in intensive care after waking from a coma, his doctor said Sunday. The statement confirmed the exact nature of the illness afflicting the artist.

Dr. Andrew Thillainayagam said Gibb had recently caught pneumonia because he was weakened from chemotherapy and two operations.

The 62-year-old singer fell into a coma last week after contracting the pneumonia. Thillainayagam said that three days ago he had warned Gibb's family that he may not wake up. Instead, Gibb is now fully conscious and able to speak.

Thillainayagam said Gibb is still in intensive care and is "exhausted, extremely weak and malnourished." He is breathing with the help of an oxygen mask and needs intravenous feeding and antibiotics.

"It is testament to Robin's extraordinary courage, iron will and deep reserves of physical strength that he has overcome quite incredible odds to get where he is now," Thillainayagam said in a statement.

He added: "Robin's wife, Dwina, and son, Robin-John; his son, Spencer; and daughter, Melissa, have been at his bedside every day, talking to him and playing his favorite music to him. They have been tireless in their determination never to give up on him."

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Nelson ceremony goes to pot

Country music legend Willie Nelson helped unveil a statue honoring him in downtown Austin by singing his new song "Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die" on Friday, a date long reserved to celebrate marijuana use.

The faint smell of marijuana smoke wafted through a crowd of about 2,000 people as Austin Mayor Lee Leffingwell accepted the privately funded statue as a gift from a private arts group. Organizers said they didn't intentionally choose April 20 for the event, but once they found out, they scheduled the unveiling at 4:20 p.m. as a tongue-in-cheek reference to Nelson's openness about his marijuana use and advocacy for its legalization.

The statute stands in front of the Moody Theater, where the Austin City Limits Studio is now located. Nelson, a 10-time Grammy Award winner who has sold more than 40 million copies of his 150 albums, appeared on the first episode of the public television show in 1974.

"He is the man who more than any other made Austin the live music capital of the world," Leffingwell said.

Nelson was born in Abbott, a tiny town about 120 miles north of Austin, but he has lived in Texas' capital city since 1971.

Longtime friend and fellow singer-songwriter Kris Kristofferson congratulated Nelson, saying he couldn't have imagined the city honoring Nelson during the early days of what became known as the Cosmic Cowboy movement in music.

Nelson, who wore black jeans, a black T-shirt and a black cowboy hat, is notoriously shy about such honors. Before he began performing, with his sister Bobbie Nelson on piano, he thanked the organizers and joked with the crowd that had gathered to watch the ceremony.

"What time is it?" he joked as the clock approach 4:20 p.m. "I feel it's getting close to something."