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Chemical used to strip paint tied to deaths

DETROIT (AP) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a warning this week about using a common paint-stripping chemical to refinish bathtubs after tying it to 13 deaths in 10 states.

The CDC said the alert was based on research that began at Michigan State University. Scientists found 13 deaths between 2000 and 2011 of workers using products containing methylene chloride to strip paint from residential bathtubs. Three of the deaths were in Michigan, and the remaining 10 were reported in nine other states.

Methylene chloride is widely used as a degreaser and paint remover in industrial and home-improvement products.

"Each death occurred in a residential bathroom with inadequate ventilation," the CDC said in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. "Protective equipment, including a respirator, either was not used or was inadequate to protect against methylene chloride vapor."

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1 of 2 brothers guilty in racial bombing

PHOENIX (AP) -- A jury Friday found one of two white supremacist brothers guilty in the racially motivated bombing of a city official in suburban Phoenix in 2004.

The jury found Dennis Mahon guilty in the bombing but found his identical twin brother Daniel Mahon not guilty.

The verdict came nearly eight years to the day since the Feb. 26, 2004, bombing that injured Don Logan, who is black and was Scottsdale's diversity director at the time.

Prosecutors argued that the Mahon brothers bombed Logan on behalf of a group called the White Aryan Resistance, which they said encourages members to act as "lone wolves" and commit violence against non-whites and the government. Defense attorneys argued that someone working for the city of Scottsdale was a likelier candidate because Logan's job made him unpopular.

They also criticized the use of Rebecca Williams, 41, as an informant, calling her a "trailer park Mata Hari" after the exotic dancer convicted of being a German spy during World War I. She wore revealing clothes and sent racy photos to the brothers to win their trust.