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AROUND THE NATION

Head of Apple design awarded knighthood

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Fans of the clean, inviting look of the iPhone, iPad and other blockbuster Apple products are legion, and that includes Queen Elizabeth II.

The British monarch has awarded a knighthood to Jonathan Paul Ive, a Brit and head of Apple Inc.'s design team since the mid-'90s.

Ive received an Order of the British Empire for services to design and enterprise.

Ive is credited with helping the late Steve Jobs bring the consumer-electronics company back from the brink of financial ruin in the late 1990s with his whimsical design for the iMac computer, which originally came in bright colors at a time bland shades dominated the PC world.

He later helped transform Apple into the envy of Silicon Valley with the iPod, the iPhone and, most recently, the iPad.

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No reports of damage in minor earthquake

McDONALD, Ohio (AP) -- Authorities say a minor earthquake hit in northeast Ohio.

The U.S. Geological Survey says the 4.0 magnitude quake struck Saturday afternoon in McDonald, outside of Youngstown.

There were no immediate reports of damage. One witness about 20 miles from the epicenter says she saw the ornaments shake on her Christmas tree. Others say it was strong enough to panic pets and send relatives running for cover.

It was the latest in a series of minor quakes in the area in 2011, though residents say Saturday's appeared to be stronger than others. Many have struck near an injection well used to dispose of brine water that's a byproduct of oil and gas drilling.

Its owner agreed last week to stop injecting brine into the earth while the quakes are investigated.

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A million-dollar bill buys man court time

LEXINGTON, N.C. (AP) -- Do you have change for a million-dollar bill?

Police say a North Carolina man insisted his million-dollar note was real when he was buying $476 worth of items at a Walmart.

Investigators told the Winston-Salem Journal that 53-year-old Michael Fuller tried to buy a vacuum cleaner, a microwave oven and other items. Store employees called police after his insistence that the bill was legit, and Fuller was arrested. The largest bill in circulation is $100.

Fuller was charged with attempting to obtain property by false pretense and uttering a forged instrument.