Share this article

print logo

Record numbers in the red

Rory McIlroy isn't the only golfer having his way with the Blue Course at the U.S. Open. See the 65s from Jason Day and Lee Westwood? And the 66s from Webb Simpson and Fredrik Jacobson? Count 'em: a record-setting 26 rounds under par on Saturday.

"I've been a little disappointed with the golf course the last couple of days. It wasn't as firm and fast as I would like to have seen it," said defending champion Graeme McDowell, whose red-number contribution was a 69 that put him at even par going into today. "The greens are soaking wet, and so are the fairways. It's target golf. It's not really a U.S. Open."

The previous record for subpar rounds in the third round of a U.S. Open was 24, set at Medinah in 1990. Congressional could produce scores like this back when the Kemper was played here and no one would blink, but it's now supposed to be rigged up for the toughest test in golf.

"You can take advantage of it and go for more flags than you can in a U.S. Open," said Jacobson, who birdied 10 of 15 holes with nary a bogey during a stretch that began late in the second round. "That's why I think we're seeing red numbers. If it rains a bit, you've got to try and make the most out of it."

The U.S. Golf Association spent years planning for this weekend. All the greens were rebuilt. Tee boxes were moved back so far that they're nearly bisecting other fairways, making it often confusing to figure out which hole is next without the aid of a map or a directional sign. It's a whopping 7,574 yards from start to finish if all the back tees are used.

But last week's stifling temperatures and humidity sent the heat index into triple-digit territory, stunting the growth of the rough, wilting the fairways and greens and putting the USGA behind in its preparations. The rain finally started falling on Thursday after play was under way -- literally a gift from the heavens for anyone who likes their golf in the 60s.

Those not shooting in the red are faulting themselves for leaving strokes on the course. World No. 1 Luke Donald said he "could've shot a couple under quite easily" if he'd only made a few putts.

"The rough isn't quite as gnarly as at some other U.S. Opens," Donald said after his third-round 74. "It has that different feel. It almost feels like the Firestone or something. It's still tough out there, some tough pins, and you've got to play well to shoot a good score."

Westwood certainly wasn't pining for a harder course after his three straight birdies on the back nine Saturday. For him, all that red on the leader board is a refreshing U.S. Open change.

There are no comments - be the first to comment