Share this article

print logo

Last week in Congress/How our representatives voted

Here are the recent votes of Western New York's three members of the House of Representatives on major legislation in Congress. A "Y" means the member voted for the measure; an "N" means the member voted against the measure; an "A" means the member did not vote. There were no Senate votes.

> HOUSE

Alternative Budget for Next Decade -- The House rejected a substitute amendment, sponsored by Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, D-Mo., to a resolution to establish a budget for fiscal 2012 and outline budget levels for fiscal 2013 through fiscal 2021. The alternative proposal would cut the deficit to 1.4 percent of GDP by raising corporate taxes and taxes on the wealthy, while also preserving Social Security, Medicaid and Medicare.

The vote April 15 was 103 yeas to 303 nays.

Rep. Brian Higgins, D-Buffalo, N; Rep. Tom Reed, R-Corning, N; Rep. Louise M. Slaughter, D-Fairport, Y.

Increasing Taxes to Balance Budget -- The House rejected a substitute amendment, sponsored by Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Ariz., to a resolution to establish a budget for fiscal 2012 and outline budget levels for fiscal 2013 through fiscal 2021.

Grijalva said his alternative proposal would balance the budget by 2021 by increasing taxes on the wealthy while cutting military spending and expanding health care coverage, in a plan that was "consistent with our country's values and our country's desires."

An opponent, Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C., said the proposal would create "an avalanche of new taxes" and unwisely expand the size of government.

The vote April 15 was 77 yeas to 347 nays.

Higgins, N; Reed, N; Slaughter, Y.

Cutting Spending to Balance Budget -- The House rejected a substitute amendment, sponsored by Rep. Scott Garrett, R-N.J., to a resolution to establish a budget for fiscal 2012 and outline budget levels for fiscal 2013 through fiscal 2021.

Garrett said the alternative proposal would freeze discretionary spending at fiscal 2008 levels, preserve low tax rates, make reforms to Medicare and Social Security, and balance the budget.

An opponent, Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-N.J., said it "gives trillions in income tax breaks to the wealthiest Americans" and "trillions in tax breaks to corporations that have been shipping jobs overseas," while cutting Social Security benefits and benefits for the disabled and military veterans.

The vote April 15 was 119 yeas to 136 nays.

Higgins, A; Reed, N; Slaughter, A.

Health Care, Tax Increases and Deficit Cuts -- The House rejected a substitute amendment, sponsored by Rep. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., to a resolution to establish a budget for fiscal 2012 and outline budget levels for fiscal 2013 through fiscal 2021.

The alternative proposal would have cut the deficit by $1.2 trillion more than was proposed by President Obama, preserved the guarantee of Medicare coverage, eliminated various special interest tax cuts and raised taxes on the wealthy to the level in place during the Clinton administration.

The vote April 15 was 166 yeas to 259 nays.

Higgins, Y; Reed, N; Slaughter, Y.

Budgeting for 2012 Through 2021 -- The House passed a resolution, sponsored by Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., to establish a budget for fiscal 2012 and outline budget levels for fiscal 2013 through fiscal 2021.

Ryan said that by cutting spending $6.2 trillion from the level proposed by President Obama, his budget "pays off our debt, gets our debt manageable, pre-empts and prevents a debt crisis, and fixes this so we can preserve this great legacy of giving the next generation a higher standard of living."

An opponent, Rep. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., said it would hurt the economy, benefit the very wealthy and corporate special interests, and cut Medicare and Medicaid along with needed "investments in our kids' classrooms, in scientific research and in critical infrastructure for this country."

The vote April 15 was 235 yeas to 193 nays.

Higgins, N; Reed, Y; Slaughter, N.

Information for this column is supplied by Targeted News Service.

There are no comments - be the first to comment