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SPAIN'S ROYAL COUPLE VISIT BUSH AT RANCH

Spain's king brought President Bush a message of good will Wednesday from Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, whose vocal opposition to the Iraq war has chilled U.S.-Spanish relations.

Zapatero, head of the Spanish government, has written and called Bush to congratulate him on his re-election, but can't get past the White House switchboard. Bush sent him a note earlier this month thanking him.

By contrast, King Juan Carlos, who holds no political power, was ferried onto Bush's ranch aboard a Marine Corps helicopter bearing the U.S. presidential seal.

He was accompanied by his wife, Queen Sofia, for the one-hour, 20-minute stay. Bush drove his white pickup truck to the landing site, accompanied by his wife, Laura, and his father, former President George H.W. Bush.

The elder Bush was at the ranch as part of a family Thanksgiving celebration that would also ring in the 23rd birthdays of the president's twin daughters.

HINCKLEY BID TO EXTEND HOSPITAL LEAVES REJECTED

WASHINGTON (AP) - A federal judge ruled Wednesday that presidential assailant John Hinckley Jr. cannot spend several days at a time away from a mental hospital as Hinckley had requested.

Hinckley can continue making shorter, overnight visits with his parents without supervision.

U.S. District Judge Paul L. Friedman said the man who shot President Ronald Reagan in 1981 could take up to six 32-hour visits in the Washington, D.C., area. Hinckley had sought permission to stay four nights at his parents' home every two weeks.

Hinckley, 49, has lived at St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington since he was acquitted in 1982 by reason of insanity in the shootings of Reagan and three others. Hinckley said he shot Reagan to impress actress Jodie Foster.

DEPARTING CIA AIDE SAYS 'TIRADES' HAMPER REFORM

WASHINGTON (AP) - Responding to severe criticism of the CIA, the agency's departing deputy director has called for an end to the "tirades and hyperbole" that he said are hampering constructive debate about needed intelligence reform.

"The time has come to turn down the temperature of the debate, to take a deep breath, and to get some balance and thoughtfulness into the discussion," John McLaughlin said in an article in the Washington Post.

McLaughlin, a 32-year agency veteran, announced his resignation earlier this month and described it as a "purely personal decision."

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