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AROUND THE WORLD

BLAIR URGES U.S. TO SEEK ALLIED HELP IN TERROR WAR

LONDON (AP) -- British Prime Minister Tony Blair, seeking to repair strained ties between the United States and Europe, on Monday urged Washington to reach out to its allies and not depend on military force alone in the global fight against terrorism.

In a speech to the Lord Mayor's Banquet, Blair also said democracy is the key to stability in Afghanistan, Iraq and the Middle East.

"Democracy is the meeting point for Europe and America. I am not . . . advocating a series of military solutions to achieve it. . . . Europe and America should be working together to bring the democratic, human, political rights that we take for granted to the world," Blair said. "None of this will work, however, unless America, too, reaches out. Multilateralism that works should be its aim. I have no sympathy for unilateralism for its own sake."

Blair views Britain as an important diplomatic bridge between America and mainland Europe, and he believes that, as President Bush's closest overseas ally, he can help heal divisions that emerged over the war in Iraq.

BROADER ARREST POWERS SOUGHT TO FIGHT RADICALS

THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS (AP) -- Spurred by the first terrorist killing on its soil, the Dutch justice minister said Monday that authorities need broader arrest powers to combat a growing threat from Islamic radicals in the Netherlands.

In an interview, Justice Minister Piet Hein Donner also suggested that the spread of Islamic radicalism is more widespread than the government previously acknowledged.

He said the new laws would empower counterterrorism investigators to detain suspects without evidence that they might have committed a crime.

"In those cases where we can't even clearly prove the existence of recruitment or radicalization, but only have a suspicion, we will still use possible administrative powers and other powers to disrupt it as much as possible," said Donner, the country's leading counterterrorism official.

The proposals follow the Nov. 2 slaying of filmmaker Theo van Gogh, whose latest movie denounced the treatment of women in Muslim countries. An alleged Islamic extremist has been arrested in the slaying.

DARFUR CRISIS STIRS CALL FOR SANCTIONS, EMBARGO

NAIROBI, KENYA (AP) -- The U.N. Security Council should impose sanctions on Sudan's government and enforce an arms embargo on pro-government Arab militias accused of ethnic cleansing in the country's Darfur region, a human rights group and aid agencies said Monday.

Sudan has failed to disarm and disband the Arab militias responsible for atrocities, instead absorbing some into its security forces "to 'guard' the camps of the very same displaced civilians whom they had originally burned out of their villages," Human Rights Watch said in its report.

Last week, one of those camps was forcibly dismantled by Sudanese forces, driving the people who sought refuge there back into Darfur's arid countryside, the group said.

The report, "If We Return We Will Be Killed," was released ahead of the Security Council's special session on Sudan opening in Nairobi on Thursday. The United Nations says the Darfur conflict has created the world's worst humanitarian crisis, claiming at least 70,000 lives since March.

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