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KERRY'S TESTIMONY AFTER WAR IS EVIDENCE HE CAN'T BE TRUSTED

Sen. John Kerry's domestic agenda to expand government to cover a wide range of social services is praised by his supporters. Believing this socialistic vision of government to be morally and economically superior to traditional capitalism, they see higher taxes and more regulations as necessary for the greater good. About such matters we can have reconcilable differences.

What is more difficult for many to reconcile is Kerry's fitness for the presidency. His voting record against modern weapon systems and higher intelligence agency budgets is troubling. More troubling is his apparent willingness to cede large portions of American sovereignty to the United Nations. For example, Kerry would give the U.N. a voice in determining our national defense policies and grant foreign leaders authority to put U.S. military personnel on trial in a World Criminal Court.

Unforgiveable to many of us, especially veterans, was Kerry's 1971 televised testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, accusing American GIs of committing atrocities.

Today Kerry's photograph hangs in a Vietnamese War museum, honoring him for his help in defeating the United States. Can such a man be trusted as president and commander in chief?

James A. Costa Jr.

Elma