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GRANT TO EASE COLLEGE PATH FOR CITY STUDENTS

The University at Buffalo has won a $480,000 federal grant to support a 37-year-old program at the university that helps students from low-income families in Buffalo get into college.

The $480,468 grant from the U.S. Department of Education's TRIO-Upward Bound Program will allow UB to help 120 students at Buffalo city schools enroll in and do well in college, said Julius G. Adams, interim executive director for UB's Office of University Preparatory Programs. That office oversees UB's Upward Bound Program.

"The goal is to help them meet their potential," said Adams, who also is associate dean for teacher education in the Graduate School of Education.

Rep. Thomas M. Reynolds, R-Clarence, whose district includes UB's North Campus, announced the grant. Reynolds has been a supporter of the Upward Bound Program, and urged the Department of Education to approve UB's grant application, said Christopher Knospe, the congressman's district director.

UB has operated Upward Bound for 37 years, Adams said, most recently under a four-year, $1.78 million federal grant that expires June 30.

The $480,000 competitive grant is good for 2003-04.

Upward Bound helps students in 10 Buffalo public high schools and four middle schools, Adams said. Two-thirds are low-income and would be the first in their family to attend college; the remaining third must fit into one of the two categories.

Counselors from UB work with students in after-school programs, tutor the students on their class work, set up college visits and assist them in preparing college and financial-aid applications. The students also spend six weeks in the summer in an intensive residential program at UB.

Part of the program's work is to convince students that college is a reachable goal, Adams said, and that includes working with their parents.

So far, every student who has participated in UB's Upward Bound Program ended up enrolling at a two- or four-year college, he said.

"It's a wonderful success rate," Adams said.

e-mail: swatson@buffnews.com

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