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HYPE

WHAT'S HAPPENING:

Movies: Opening Friday, "Dr. Dolittle 2" (Eddie Murphy returns).

New on video: Today, "Save the Last Dance" (Julia Stiles); "Proof of Life" (Russell Crowe as a hostage rescuer).

Concerts: Wednesday, Dave Matthews Band, Ralph Wilson Stadium; July 2, Dido (With Travis), Six Flags Darien Lake.

Other: July 23, World Wrestling Federation "Raw Is War," HSBC Arena.

SUN SHINE
Glitter makeup quickly carved its spot on the list of up-to-the-minute beauty trends, so it's no surprise that its sparkly sisters would do pretty well too. That's why this summer, the glistening creation of the moment is glitter sunscreen. That's right, glitter-infused sunscreen is the newest oh-so-fashionable way to protect your skin from the sun's damaging rays.

The Sungirl line is cheap and chic (two ingredients for a perfect product, as far as we're concerned). And it comes in a dozen colors and four levels of sun protection -- oil-free SPF 3 for deep tanning, oil-free SPF 10, Velvet Sheen SPF 20 and ultra-waterproof SPF 30. And this cool product isn't just about looking good -- when you can't see the glitter anymore, it's time to reapply. A 2.2-ounce bottle of the shimmering sunscreen will run you about $7 at select Wal-Mart and Kmart stores, and some supermarkets and drugstores. Can't find it where you live? Log on to www.sungirl.com and order it online.

THE CAMP OPTION
Still asking yourself "What am I going to do over the summer?" Why not try your hand at being a camp counselor? These sites on the Internet may help:

CampJobs.com (www.campjobs.com) is a national online database that allows you to search for your ideal camp job by type, state and position. You can post a personal resume on the site.

Camp Staff (www.campstaff.com) targets college-age students, but many camps in the site's directory are also seeking teen help.

SummerJobs.com (www.summerjobs.com) has camp job listings and listings for unique seasonal work (like a hot-air balloon ground crew).

STRANGER THAN FICTION
Author William E. Coles Jr. creates a page-turner of a suspense novel out of a historical event from Pittsburgh, Pa., in "Compass in the Blood" (Atheneum, $16). It's based on the true story of Katherine Soffel, a prison warden's wife who fell in love with a Death Row inmate and helped him and his brother escape -- except that both brothers were gunned down by a posse. Mrs. Soffel was wounded but recovered. The novel is told as the story of a college freshman recruited by a Pittsburgh television reporter to pry information out of an elderly man who may know the secret location of Mrs. Soffel's burial plot. Coles offers interesting information that casts doubt on the traditional version of events in the Soffel case (was the "escape" engineered by the warden in a plot to grab his wife's money?) and a spellbinding story that basically boils down to a lesson on how to track down a body in a cemetery plot.

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