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TWO MAIL ORDER SOURCES ALLOW SPRING PLANS TO GO TO SEED

Spring is not far away when tree and shrub seed and seedling order forms arrive.

Two good sources for tree and shrub seedlings and various mixes of wildflower seeds are now accepting mail order forms:

2000 Conservation Tree & Shrub Seeding Program of the Erie County Soil & Water Conservation District, 50 Commerce Way, in East Aurora, provides evergreen/conifer, broadleaf deciduous, conservation shrubs, ground cover, and many assortments of wildflower seed mixes as well as accessories, including tree shelter tubes.

Orders must be received by March 10 to be processed for the April 15 pick-up date at the Erie County Fairgrounds. To receive an order form, call 652-8506 or e-mail: swed@nyeastauro.fsc.usda.gov.

The DEC Trees and Shrubs Planting in New York 2000 program, providing stock from the Saratoga Tree Nursery, accepts tree and shrub phone orders until mid-May. The program offers conifer, hardwood and mixed "wildlife" species. The order form includes planting information, site preparation and tips for care after planting. To receive a brochure in the Buffalo-Olean area, call 372-0645; in the Rochester-Bath area, call (607) 776-2165.

Turkey transfer

Citizenship changed for 33 wild turkeys on the morning of Jan. 21.

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation is cooperating in a trap and transfer effort to establish wild turkeys in southern Ontario. Gerald Mikol, Region 9 Director, and Russ Biss, DEC Region 9 wildlife manager, met with Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources officials at Devils Hole State Park that morning to transfer 33 birds trapped at various sites around New York.

The most recent transfer was of birds mainly trapped in Saratoga and Otsego Counties, where turkey populations are heavy. Gary Hill, retired DEC biologist, supervised much of the trapping. Joel Pederson of the National Wild Turkey Federation in Edgefield, S.C. was on hand for the transfer. NWTF is a major sponsor of the program.

OMNR biologist Mike Malhiot received the birds, which, after an inspection by Ontario officials, were released in areas of southern Ontario. Wild turkeys only inhabit about one third of Ontario's land areas suitable for turkey survival. The effort, begun in 1986 and then abandoned, was restarted in 1999 and will continue with hopes of establishing wild turkey populations similar to those in New York, Michigan and many other northern states.

Turkey tally

Turkey hunters did well during the warm, dry days this past fall season.

Russ Biss, reporting at the WNY Environmental Federation meeting last week, noted the statewide 1999 fall take was 8,078 birds, up from 6,044 in 1998. Region 9 increased its harvest from 1,627 in 1998 to 1,781 in 1999. Niagara County (40) and Erie County (16), opened in 1999, also did well.

Chainsaw rendezvous

Artists will exhibit and design wildlife carvings done with chainsaws at the Chainsaw Rendezvous in Ridgeway, Pa., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 12. Proceeds from an auction at 4 p.m. will go to the Make a Wish Foundation. Carvers from around the northeast to South Florida will gather to show realistic bears, owls, eagles, wolves and many other outdoor fauna -- and some flora -- done in pine and hardwood. For directions, call 599-3043 or (814) 776-1614.

Wild kids

Youths interested in having their outdoor stories, artwork or photos published can do so on the web with a few clicks.

Call of the Wild Kids e-zine, a new Internet site, lets kids ages 10 to 18 publish their stories, photos or art on the web for free. Topics include fishing, canoeing, camping, hiking, horseback riding, hunting, sailing, shooting, archery, bird watching, exploring, nature, conservation, sailing and others.

The site, edited by Christopher Knauss, can be viewed at: www.callofthewildkids.com.

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