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RESTAURANT, CITY FEUD OVER CLOSED RESTROOMS

The operator of the Greens Restaurant at the Hyde Park Golf Course said the city is damaging his business by deciding to close public restrooms in the building during hours the nearby Adelphia Sports Center is not open.

Mario Bertozzi, who operates the restaurant with his wife Susan, said he received a letter from city Parks and Public Works Director Ronald C. Shiesley last month, announcing the plan. It is to take effect when the outdoor golf season ends, which depends on the fall weather.

Bertozzi said the letter also complained about the alleged poor condition of the carpet in the restaurant and foul odors. Bertozzi said as far as he's concerned, the city owns the building and it's the city's responsibility to maintain it.

Shiesley disagreed, saying Bertozzi is responsible for upkeep.

The Greens is open to the general public year-round, and has a bar that stays open nightly until after midnight.

The restrooms Shiesley plans to close are outside the restaurant in a hallway, and are used by restaurant patrons, golfers, and customers of the Adelphia "golf dome," which is open seven days a week until 9 p.m.

Bertozzi said, "We definitely couldn't stay open (after 9 p.m.) with no restrooms. We would lose a lot of revenue." Bertozzi is allowed to keep whatever profit the Greens generates.

Asked if he would have to go out of business, Bertozzi said, "It definitely wouldn't help."

Shiesley said the restaurant has restrooms off the kitchen.

But Bertozzi said the restrooms off the restaurant kitchen are for employees only, and are only accessible by walking through the kitchen.

"They're not handicapped-accessible. It would cost megabucks to get them ready for the customers," he said.

Shiesley said the hallway restrooms "were never intended for his customers. They're mainly for the golfers."

He said the city will save money because workers won't have to go in on overtime to lock them and clean them.

As for the upkeep, Bertozzi said, "It's up to the city to replace the carpet. And I don't seem to think there is a smell."

Said Shiesley: "Our inspectors go in there and they say there's an awful odor."

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