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SHORT TAKES

ACNE-DRUG WARNING
Teens with acne, take note: Makers of the popular prescription acne medication Accutane say they will add a warning to the label, telling doctors to look out for depression and suicidal tendencies in their patients. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Hoffmann-La Roche say they've received reports of depression and suicide in teens taking the severe-acne medicine.

SECONDHAND RISKS

Kids who live with an adult who smokes are more likely to have lung illnesses, a federal study says. Docs who did the study say it helps prove that secondhand smoke is a health hazard to kids. Compared with children from non-smoking homes, kids between 2 months and 5 years old who lived with pack-a-day smokers were twice as likely to have asthma. They were 2.5 times as likely to have chronic bronchitis and 2.7 times as likely to have wheezing fits.

NO BUTTS
The Clinton administration has gotten the word out to states: Stop kids from buying cigarettes, or lose your anti-drug money. If under 20 percent of kids who try to buy smokes can do so, the state is in compliance. Only four states are: Florida, Maine, New Hampshire and Washington. Listen for radio ads urging kids and businesses to obey the law.

TERROR WEAR?
If a kid's clothing creeps someone out, that's one thing. But if a kid's behavior is a threat to other kids, that's another matter. That's the idea behind a recent dispute in Grand Blanc, Mich. A group of parents whose kids go to Grand Blanc Middle School asked the school board to ban clothing that imitates shock rocker Marilyn Manson -- you know, black clothes, black capes and black makeup. The parents said the kids are scaring other kids. These kids, the parents said, have threatened other students, saying lame stuff about drinking blood and passing out Satanic literature. Superintendent Gary Lipe said the school would take action if the black-clothes kids were actually intimidating others. "If it is a gang infringing on the rights of other students, then that would not be acceptable," he told the Flint Journal newspaper. "But if they are quietly wearing items that reflect their beliefs, then that's their right."

-- Knight Ridder

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