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CARTER OPENS MUSEUM AT TRAIN DEPOT THAT ONCE WAS CAMPAIGN HEADQUARTERS

Surrounded by the people in the town he says made him president, Jimmy Carter opened the door to a museum Saturday at the old train depot that once served as his campaign headquarters.

"It goes way back to tie my political career back to Plains," Carter said before the ceremony during the south Georgia town's first peanut festival. "In essence, it proves that no matter where I was campaigning, I came home."

The three-room museum spotlights Carter's road from his run for state senate through his election as governor to his inauguration as the 39th U.S. president.

The exhibits include a copy of the November 1976 Playboy, which had the interview in which Carter drew snickers for earnestly admitting he had committed "lust in my heart."

Carter saw the Playboy in the museum and commented "Why not? That's part of the story," said Bob Lindzey, a member of the Carter Political Items Collectors group.

Carter had asked members of the collectors group to restore the depot as a museum.

Fred Boyles, superintendent of the Jimmy Carter Historic Site, said the museum cost $500,000 in private funds. The depot building belongs to the National Park Service.

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