Share this article

print logo

FOUR WAYS TO LOOK AT PERSIAN GULF CRISIS

Fear for loved ones dominates each day

I have great fear and apprehension of what seems an inevitable war in the Persian Gulf. I am afraid for the American servicemen bravely serving in the gulf, and for their families who are left behind. I am afraid for my 21-year-old fiance and 20-year-old brother who may face the draft if war breaks out.

Both my brother and fiance oppose war and killing for religious and moral reasons. They oppose abortion, the death penalty, and even hunting. They especially oppose the shedding of innocent lives for any reason. Unfortunately, such opposition will mean little or nothing if the draft is reinstituted.

I live each day with terror in my heart. It is terror that I will soon lose the love of my life, the man who is to be the father of my children, the man I have dreamed about all of my life. We have been planning our wedding for nearly a year now. It is to take place in August. I live in fear that this very special day will never take place. I cannot bear the thought of losing the most important person in my life.

I live each day afraid of losing the brother I have watched grow up into a special young man. He is someone who will one day start a family of his own, and contribute to this nation by becoming a teacher. The dreams I have for him may soon be lost.

At a time when I should be studying for the final exams of my senior year of college, I am not. I cannot concentrate. All I can do is cry, pray, and spend as much time as possible with my fiance and brother in fear I may never see them again. Even if they came home from war alive, they would not truly be living. Given their very strong moral and religious beliefs, taking part in a war which promises to result in much bloodshed would be devastating. It would destroy their souls.

BRIDGETTE MILLICH
Tonawanda

Hawks shed blood to protect the doves

We hawks have as much right to our opinion as do the doves of this great nation. And it has been our opinion to fight the wars that needed to be fought, no matter what the reason.

The hawks have made the U.S. a safe haven for the doves to live and prosper. Someday, the doves will outnumber the hawks and be able to transform this planet into a world of peace. Until then, the hawks will continue to shed their blood that this might someday become a reality.

Just in case you are wondering, my 17-year-old son has pre-enlisted in the U.S. Army. He will leave for helicopter pilot training the day after he graduates from high school. He may see action in the Persian Gulf. He might have to shed his blood for the doves, too.

RONALD JABLONSKI
Hamburg

Call-up of husband means lower income

It's unfortunate that so many people like a letter writer Dec. 4 are of the opinion that our military men and women, especially reservists, have nothing to complain about with regard to Operation Desert Shield. The writer feels that they should earn their pay, since "they've been getting a free ride from the government."

My husband is a full-time federal civil employee working for the Department of Defense. He is not a reservist by choice; it's a requirement of his job. Many of the men and women activated with the 914th Air Reserve of Niagara Falls are in the same type of position.

These people work full-time at keeping very old aircraft ready for whatever missions the Air Force needs them for, keeping in mind that they perform peacetime missions also. For the past three years, the 914th has rotated down to Panama for a five-week period of active duty, with each member rotating down for his required two weeks.

Presently, my husband is doing his regular job, now in uniform in a potential war zone. But because his military status is lower than his civilian status, our income is less. So I'm tired of ignorant, uninformed people saying that reservists should earn their money.

I face lonely holidays without my husband. I pity the letter writer who, through his hard-hearted ignorance, shows the same unfortunate apathetic attitude prevalent during the Vietnam era.

JUDITH ZEHLER
Buffalo

Crisis in gulf serves as diversion for Bush

I speak out in favor of sending our troops home where they belong.

A life is too precious a commodity to risk over the price of a gallon of gas. Or are we merely protecting George Bush's oil investments? The gulf crisis is a fine diversion to our problems at home, namely the budget, not to mention George Bush's own dirty laundry in the S&L scandal.

Send our troops home, and end this crisis with the intelligence it takes to be peaceful.

PATRICIA A. GILMOUR
Buffalo

There are no comments - be the first to comment