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History

When it was announced that a Wyndham Hotel would occupy the long-dormant AM&A’s flagship department store, it was the most recent of several upscale hotel chains to enter into the city’s burgeoning hospitality market. Over the last four years, the Hilton, Marriott and Westin brands have planted their flags alongside such stalwarts as the Hyatt Regency and, more rec…

History

Buffalo now has a touch of London's Piccadilly Circus. On Tuesday, pedestrians and bicyclists gawked at the sight of a red double-decker bus making its inaugural trip from the Outer Harbor. "Buffalo Double Decker Bus Tours" was written on the sides in black and white striping, with "Sightseeing Tours, Murder Mysteries and Tavern Tours" in smaller letters. "The bus…

History

Buffalo’s most famous – or infamous – season has long been the butt of jokes, largely on account of that pesky Blizzard of ’77. Of course, one season of falling snow, frigid temperatures and high winds should not define a city – Buffalo has a lifetime of that season, to her credit – but winter did contribute to one of the costliest disasters in the city’s hi…

Local News

A lot of people had high expectations Friday for the release of a report on the rebirth of the Central Terminal. Then came the recommendations. “This was sorely, sorely disappointing,” said Elizabeth Giles, a board member with Citizens for Regional Transit. “What a waste of time.” “There was nothing new,” said Eddy Dobosiewicz of Forgotten Buffalo, an …

Health and Fitness

Bob D. McFarland never served in the military but his life’s work has revolved around veterans. McFarland, of South Buffalo, worked for three decades as a licensed practical nurse with VA medical centers in Batavia and Buffalo. After his retirement, he became chief docent in 2012 at the Buffalo and Erie County Naval & Military Park (buffalonavalpark.org). He be…

History

On the afternoon of Thursday, Oct. 10, 1911, schoolmates Joey Josephs and Gordon Pitton were playing together along Ridge Road in Lackawanna when a middle-aged stranger approached them. The well-dressed man chatted briefly with the two boys and offered to buy them both candy – an offer that 7-year-old Joey enthusiastically accepted. Joey hurried to purchase some swee…

History

The unassuming northeast corner where Main and Seneca streets intersect belies its history. Today, 237 Main St. is the site of a construction project to transform the 16-story building into a combination of apartments, offices and banquet space. Hints of the building’s past as headquarters of the Marine Trust Co. abound – whether they be the carvings of an anchor an…

Business

In 1989, the historic Bank of Buffalo building and its domed roof were carefully taken apart, piece by piece, in a hopeful effort to preserve the granite facade and other decorative elements after the structure was badly damaged. Located next to the Merchants Mutual Insurance building at the corner of Main and Seneca streets, the vacant bank facility had been badly dama…

History

In the early morning of Feb. 7, 1957, Irma Gill was enjoying a comfortable night’s rest in the small third-floor apartment she shared with her 19-year-old daughter in Buffalo’s Commodore Perry housing complex. Around 1 a.m., she was awakened by the unmistakable sound of screaming.   Jumping from her bed, Gill moved quickly to the nearest window and peered down at t…

History

When John F. Kennedy was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963, it marked the first time in our nation’s history that an event of such magnitude was broadcast across our television screens. A stunned nation watched a visibly shaken Walter Cronkite announce the death of the president. The images that followed are forever etched in our collective memory: a solemn Lyndon B. John…

History

Last month, I asked our readers which demolished building they wished were still standing today — the Erie County Savings Bank or the Larkin Administration Building. Readers cast their votes on a Chronicles’ tweet. I expected polling to be close, but I may as well have asked readers if they preferred blue cheese or ranch with their chicken wings. The results were, q…

History

On the early evening of Saturday, Aug. 21, 1948, 38-year-old Helen Lindeman – clad in a pink sleeveless housedress to combat the late summer heat – ventured out into her Kenmore neighborhood to run a few errands and to purchase a quart of milk. Lindeman was last spotted on Delaware Avenue at around 6 p.m. that night, walking just a few hundred feet from her h…

History

In 1825, around the same time Gov. DeWitt Clinton was celebrating the wedding of the waters with the opening of the Erie Canal, Mordecai Noah was devising a plan to transform 2,000 acres of wilderness on Grand Island into a refuge for Jewish settlers. It was to be called “Ararat,” after the resting place of Noah’s Ark, and would have been situated near the intersec…

History

Standing at the empty, wedge-shaped parcel of land where Ohio and Chicago streets meet, it is hard to imagine what the Old First Ward neighborhood looked like over 60 years ago. Any remnants of the homes and businesses that lined these streets have long been demolished, save the long-vacant E. & B. Holmes Machinery Co. Building. Six decades ago, these same streets bust…

History

When it was announced in June 2013 that Dipson Theatres would not renew its lease with North Park Theatre, many wondered if the curtain had finally fallen on the historic neighborhood theater. The passage of time, previous owners’ indifference to the building, and the exorbitant cost of digital projection were all capable villains for this poor damsel in distress. Fo…