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Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of March 2, 1917: * Congress granted President Woodrow Wilson the power to arm all American ships in an effort to protect lives against German submarine warfare. * A hearing was held about improvements to the trolley car system, which was the biggest mode of transportation in the area. A citizens group battled …

Continuing BN Chronicles’ weeklong look at Delaware Avenue, today we look at several photos that show Buffalo’s traditionally most-aristocratic street resplendent in the trappings of eras gone by.   Some scenes don’t look too much different, save the make and model of the vehicles more than a century later. Others are completely of another time. …

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 28, 1917: * By all accounts, the United States' entry to World War I is "imminent." After Americans were killed in the sinking of the Laconia by German torpedoes, President Woodrow Wilson wanted to arm American ships. There was jockeying in the Senate to filibuster the bill giving Wilson this power, but ult…

BN Chronicles continues a weeklong look at Delaware Avenue: “The skyline of Buffalo’s famous avenue is ever-changing, obliterating Buffalo landmarks, erasing fond memories, and beckoning to the onrush of new business,” wrote the great Buffalo historian Roy Nagle, expressing the prevailing attitude among many in Buffalo in the mid-1950s - especially those, like Nag…

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 27, 1917: * Six Americans died when the British liner Laconia was sank by German torpedoes. Buffalonian Joseph Lewis, of 63 William St., who was on the Laconia's crew, was rescued. President Woodrow Wilson viwed this act as a "clear-cut violation of American rights." Although the U.S. was not yet officially…

This week, BN Chronicles takes a look at Delaware Avenue. Few spots along Delaware Avenue, or anywhere else in the city for that matter, are at the center of more interesting stories of Buffalo’s – and America’s – history than the home generally referred to as the Ansley Wilcox Mansion. 1. The house wasn’t always “on Delaware Avenue.” In the midst of…

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 26, 1917: * The British ship Laconia was torpedoed by German submarines and sunk on its way to the U.S. from England. Americans were on board; it was said to be the biggest vessel sunk by Germany. As a result, President Wilson asked Congress to put the U.S. in a state of armed neutrality. (The U.S. would o…

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 24, 1917: * The fight against the International Railway company for better street car service is likened to David and Goliath in a front-page editorial cartoon. Membership was growing in a citizens organization to fight the company and demand better trolley service. * In World War I news, Germany sunk th…

In 1932, Buffalo was swept up in the celebration of the city’s centennial, and many groups and organizations that had existed through those 100 years took the opportunity to celebrate their own existence as well. The Buffalo Academy of Medicine — particularly proud that Buffalo’s first mayor, Ebenezer Johnson, was a medical doctor — wrote a lengthy history of th…

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 23, 1917: * The Citizens' League was formed to "put up a real fight for decent street car conditions in and near Buffalo." The group hoped to appeal to the state's Public Service Commission to investigate poor trolley conditions locally. * Both Britain and the U.S. were facing food shortages due to World …

A series of postcards showing off different portions of Main Street give a fantastic look back at the Village of Williamsville and how it’s changed since the 1960s. [Column: You live in Williamsville? No, You don't.] Government buildings on the east side of Main are a mix of old and new. The building that once housed the Amherst Police is now the Williamsvil…

Before they were even finished digging the Hamburg Canal, in 1849, the standing, fetid water in the half-dug ditch was blamed in part for a growing cholera crisis in what we now call the First Ward and Canalside areas. Originally conceived to help divert traffic away from the busy Erie Canal, soon the railroads were doing a good enough job of making the Hamburg Cana…