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A snowstorm and a couple of jackknifed tractor-trailers had Sheridan Drive backed up from just after Harlem Road all the way to Niagara Falls Boulevard in this early 1960s photo. The “C. Hettinger for Rambler” car dealership is in the foreground on the right – today, it’s about where Northtown Kia and Northtown Mazda are located. Charles Hettinger opened for bus…

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of March 14, 1917: * The American steamship Algonquin was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine while sailing to London. Luckily, there were no injuries. * Representatives from the major national railroads met to demand an eight-hour day. Plans for a strike were formed, but a peaceful resolution was hoped for…

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of March 13, 1917: * President Woodrow Wilson proposed a peace plan to end World War I. Citizens of war-torn countries were without food, and there was growing restlessness and a "growing belief that neither side can achieve an overwhelmingly victory." * The state public service commission decided to take action …

A winter storm is bearing down on Western New York — and in a bizarre coincidence, it's coming on the 24th anniversary that a deadly storm buried much of the East Coast. As Accuweather remembers it: "The Blizzard of '93 killed more than 300 people and dumped more than 20 inches of snow across a wide corridor of the Appalachians and Northeast. Fierce winds blew snow…

During the summer of 1969, 14 cases of young people being admitted to the hospital for drug-triggered attacks of terror and depression were directly linked to the ongoing “hippie gatherings” in Delaware Park. It was usually about 200 young people at “the nightly gathering of hippies in Delaware Park near the Albright-Knox.” “Some hippies create light shows …

When “The Great One” rolled up to Ted’s Jumbo Red Hots on Sheridan Drive on March 10, 1955 – 62 years ago today – he was one of America’s biggest TV stars. "The Honeymooners" didn’t debut as its own show until later that year, but Ralph, Alice, Norton and Trixie were stars of the most popular sketch on "The Jackie Gleason Show" – which was America’…

For decades before the six grain silos at the Ganson Street RiverWorks complex bore the name Labatt Blue, they bore the initials GLF. The site was home to the then- state-of-the-art Wheeler elevator starting around 1908, replacing the earlier wooden elevator shown below.   The Grange League Federation bought the elevators in 1929 and renovated and added t…

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of March 8, 1917: * The Irish Party asks for aid from Americans and Irish Americans. The debate about home rule in the British House of Commons was described as "the most bitter in months." * As Buffalo's trolley car service declined and citizens fought for improvements, it was revealed that thousands of dollars …

People find it hard to remember Fisherman’s Wharf without calling it “the infamous Fisherman’s Wharf.” The restaurant was perhaps the seediest of Chippewa’s seedy joints during the strip’s heyday as Buffalo’s de facto red light district. At a State Liquor Authority hearing in 1969, Buffalo Police said the place was frequented by disorderly women, do…

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of March 6, 1917: * Austria announced its support for the unrestricted submarine warfare that Germany had been carrying out across the globe. President Woodrow Wilson wanted to arm American ships against the German threat and was waiting for authority from Congress to do so. *At a time when Buffalonians were pa…

For as long as anyone can remember, the people of Buffalo have been fanatically devoted to sports.  Since 1960 for the Bills and 1970 for the Sabres, relatively large, rabid fan bases have supported those squads through lean years and even lean decades with open wallets and enthusiasm. But with college basketball bringing March Madness to Buffalo again next week, t…