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Thousands of Buffalo’s orphans descended on the Delaware Park Meadow on June 12, 1924, courtesy of the Automobile Club. Among the adults accompanying the children was Father Baker. "4,000 boys and girls enjoy annual outing" “Kids on the street looked up with amazement and envy as the loads of tooting and rooting orphans were whirled by in a tour of the city before being …

It’s a question Buffalo has been asking for at least 35 years, as evidenced by this article: What will become of the city's grain elevators? "Buffalo’s ghostly grain elevators: blight or economic opportunity?" “(James E.) Carr envisions the entire waterfront being put to residential and commercial uses, putting the grain elevators ‘right in the thick of things.’ ” As th…

The mighty roar of the Niagara was silenced 45 years ago today. Photo gallery here. Thousands stood and watched an international news story go from rush to trickle. The Army Corps of Engineers diverted the Niagara River to complete a survey of the rock underneath the waterfall to ensure its stability and to “enhance its beauty.” The fragility of the rock formations at th…

Over two days in 1969, reports from the NHL League meetings in Montreal moved from Vancouver, Baltimore and Cleveland as being in the lead for an NHL club. It was also reported that the men who applied for the Buffalo expansion team had just purchased a minority stake in the NHL Oakland Seals. Seymour and Northrup Knox, however, promised to continue pursuing a club for Buf…

Buffalo’s best-remembered boxing champ, Jimmy “Slats” Slattery, is pictured dropping his opponent at Queensboro Stadium, a once-popular boxing venue located under New York’s 59th Street bridge. "Here’s how Slattery looked in his metropolitan debut" “Jimmy Slattery of Buffalo is pictured above as he dropped Jack Lynch in the sixth round of their sensational battle at Quee…

Dunlop opened its Niagara River plant in Tonawanda in 1920, and it has made tires in Western New York ever since. Today, the only motorcycle tires manufactured in this country are made there. In 1924, the "buy local" cry was loud coming from Dunlop, which then made auto tires in Tonawanda as well. The ad claims that if all the tires bought in Buffalo were made in Buffalo,…

On this date in 1929, Bishop William Turner met with the captains of the St. Brigid’s and Mount St. Joseph’s grammar school baseball teams, which were about to square off at the Delaware Park diamonds. St. Brigid’s parish was in the First Ward on South Park Avenue. Mount St. Joseph Academy was in several different locations through the years, all near Main Street and Humb…

It was a shining moment in what became the Buffalo Bisons’ last season before a decade-long hiatus of professional baseball in Buffalo:  The American League Washington Senators played an exhibition game against the Herd. While the Senators were in the same dire straits as the Bisons — the team a few years later moved to Texas and became the Rangers -- the Senators’ new ma…

The big story on this day in 1914 was the wreck of "fishing smacks" in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, Chalcur Bay and the Straits of Northumberland. The photo at the top of the cover announces the marriage of "Miss Belle Wyatt Willard, daughter of the American ambassador to Spain, and Kermit Roosevelt, son of Colonel Theodore Roosevelt" in Madrid, Spain.

The Picture Page image 45 years ago shows the Huron Street steel girders of what was to become the Dulski Federal Building and, later, the upscale Avant building. "Strike-stilled frame of the new federal building is seen from Elmwood and Huron" The Thaddeus J. Dulski Federal Office Building opened at 111 W. Huron St. in 1971 and was designed by Pfohl, Roberts and Biggie …

A smiling Mayor James D. Griffin bolts up one of the signs that appeared all over North Buffalo and were a sort of Rorschach test for zoo-goers throughout the '80s as they tried to decide which animals were depicted on the signs. Note also the cast iron yellow and black "BUS STOP NFT” sign directly below. Those were soon replaced with small, blue and white sheet metal sig…

For someone in Buffalo to be able to hear the Republicans pick Calvin Coolidge as their nominee for president, live from Cleveland, was still a pretty big deal in 1929. It was such a big deal, in fact, that the local crew that made it happen posed for a News photographer to mark the occasion. Radio was still in its infancy in mid-1929. WGR, Buffalo’s first viable commerci…