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HARVARD, Mass. -- Down a rolling slope in this pastoral setting, 38 miles northwest of the famous, university bearing the same name, sits a red clapboard farmhouse. The rustic building is the centerpiece of a restored museum today. But back in 1843, the Fruitlands farmhouse - on 100 acres overlooking Nashua River Valley, the Nashua River, Mount Monadnock to the north an…

From Tesla to tourism, from the Underground Railroad to the Manhattan Project, not to mention daredevils, the Local History department of the Niagara Falls Public Library has information on it all. And soon the public will be able to see it for more hours each week. Starting Oct. 2, the library's Local History department, which in recent years had opened its wealth o…

Bill Bradberry sits in the quiet gazebo at Heritage Park, under the eye of the Turtle building, and casts his mind back in time. In his imagination, it's 1850 or so. Directly in front of him is the railroad stop that brings visitors to Niagara Falls, many of them to the impressive, modern Cataract House, just steps away. Some of the visitors come from slave states; some…

Mabel O. Wilson, a professor of architecture at Columbia University, will speak at the Martin House Complex next week about a never-built school Frank Lloyd Wright designed in 1928 for African-American children in the South. Wilson is one of the curators for the Museum of Modern Art's retrospective exhibit, "Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive," which celeb…

In the early 1890s, Buffalo was experiencing a building boom, especially when it came to big office buildings downtown. The Brisbane Building, then known as the Mooney & Brisbane Building, was said to be the world's largest mercantile and office building in the city when it was completed in 1896. But it didn't hold that title long, as the Ellicott Square Building al…

The Fenton was among a spate of hotels built to handle the throngs of visitors coming to Buffalo for the Pan-American Exposition in 1901. But it differs from most of the others, because it's still standing. Many hotels built for the exposition were temporary structures, but the Fenton was made to last. It has stood strong at Main and West Ferry streets since 1896. …

The Lenox Hotel is a noteworthy part of Buffalo's history — for many reasons. For one, it's Buffalo's oldest operating hotel, one that played host to many wealthy visitors to the Pan-American Exposition in 1901. It also briefly was home to famed author F. Scott Fitzgerald. For many today, the most important thing about the building is that a restaurant inside it su…

The difference between what the northwest corner of Delaware and Great Arrow Avenues looks like today and what it looked like during the Pan-American Exposition is striking. In 1901, a great stadium stood at the corner and hosted sports, livestock shows, automobiles, farm machinery demonstrations and even President William McKinley. It was 680 feet long and 450 feet…

Now the gateway to the Elmwood Village, the corner of Elmwood and Forest avenues was once the gateway to the Pan-American Exposition. In the years leading up to the 1901 fair, hotels began to spring up all over the city to anticipate the huge crowds. And the northeast corner of Elmwood and Forest was prime real estate to market to fairgoers, as it was a block away from …

Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, the opulent Iroquois Hotel was built at the site of the former Richmond Hotel, which burned to the ground on May 18, 1887, tragically killing 15 people. After that, fireproof building materials were used to construct the Iroquois Hotel at the intersection of Main, Eagle and Washington streets. When completed in 1889, the hotel adv…

It was a scene sure to catch anyone’s attention: a cavalcade of cadavers, coffins in tow, parading down Delaware Avenue in the dead of night. Of course, this was a thing of imagination, but it was from the imagination of author Mark Twain. They were escaping — as one skeleton described it — their dismal resting place one or two blocks north of the author’s resid…

Thirty-nine-year-old Steve Solecki and his wife, Stella, always worked late on weekends. The industrious butcher was known to stay at his store – the Cleveland Meat Market at Main Street and Center Road in Angola – until well past midnight on Saturdays, tallying the prior week’s receipts and preparing meat for the week ahead. After finishing up one such late-night…