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A celebration of the rich history of Corpus Christi Church will take place  Oct. 29 as the community gathers to mark the 110th anniversary of the laying of the cornerstone. A Mass celebrated in English and Polish will begin the day at 11 a.m. It will be followed with a talk by historian Martin Ederer, who will describe the laying of the cornerstone. A short film will…

Even before it was home to One Seneca Tower, the downtown Buffalo property bounded by Main, Seneca, Washington and Exchange streets played host to one of the tallest and most important building complexes in the city. More than a century before One Seneca – then called the Marine Midland Center – opened there in the early 1970s and became Buffalo’s tallest buil…

"Wearing the Letter P," a book about Polish women who were forced into labor in Germany from 1939 to 1945, will be the topic of a lecture at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 18, at Canisius College. Author Sophie Hodorowicz Knab wrote the book to keep a promise with her mother, who was a slave laborer during the war. German soldiers forced approximately 12 million people from al…

The recent revival of locally produced beer led by craft breweries such as Big Ditch and Resurgence in Buffalo marks a return to the city’s sudsy past, when firms like the Iroquois Brewing Co. manufactured tens of thousands of barrels of beer annually. Located on Buffalo’s Near East Side along Pratt Street between Broadway and William Street, the Iroquois brewing pl…

Michael Keene, author of "Mad House: The Hidden History of Insane Asylums in 19th Century New York," will talk about his research at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 18 at GreenField Manor, 5959 Broadway in Lancaster. Keene will discuss 19th century asylums, shedding light on treatments, doctors, patients and the gothic architecture that turned asylums into stone fortresses. …

Dozens of Buffalo's tarnished gems have been restored in recent years because of historic tax credits that came out of Washington. The Hotel @ the Lafayette. The Guaranty Building. And the Richardson Olmsted Campus to name just a few. Now the federal historic tax credit looks in danger of being eliminated. That worries developers and preservationists, who credit …

The hand written message from Elbert Hubbard is sparse and to the point: "Mother Hubbard, 9:30 a.m., Love to you all, EH." Sent on a postcard from New York City May 1, 1915, it was the last known correspondence from the founder of the Roycroft Campus in East Aurora. He then boarded the Lusitania, which was sunk by a German U-boat seven days later off the coast of Irelan…

Brady Carlson visits dead presidents. He goes to graves, travels to tombs and is moved by memorials. "Presidents keep on living long after they're gone,"  Carlson wrote in his book "Dead Presidents." Carlson will visit Forest Lawn Cemetery from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday to talk about the strange deaths and surprising afterlives of America's commanders in chief. Car…

You'll find a skeleton in every closet in the netherworld explored by Mason Winfield. Winfield built a business on spinning ghost tales during walking tours he leads through some of the area's more fabled neighborhoods. Allentown, Larkinville and the Roycroft Campus of East Aurora all hold secrets, according to Winfield. This season Winfield partnered with Nickel …

The name of Playboy magazine and the Playboy clubs once owned by the late Hugh Hefner had a Buffalo connection. It's explained inside the Buffalo Transportation/Pierce-Arrow Museum, where a white, 1947 Playboy roadster is displayed with information panels that include a photo of the dashing car in front of the then-named Albright Art Gallery. Hefner planned to name h…

A horse-drawn Jell-O wagon from between 1902 and 1904 will be unveiled Saturday, Sept. 30 at the Buffalo Transportation/Pierce-Arrow Museum. The wagon, made for the Jell-O company in Leroy, was discovered by Danielle Colby of  the History Channel's "American Pickers" show in an Ouachita Parish, La., family barn. James and Mary Ann Sandoro, the not-for-profit museum's f…

HARVARD, Mass. -- Down a rolling slope in this pastoral setting, 38 miles northwest of the famous, university bearing the same name, sits a red clapboard farmhouse. The rustic building is the centerpiece of a restored museum today. But back in 1843, the Fruitlands farmhouse - on 100 acres overlooking Nashua River Valley, the Nashua River, Mount Monadnock to the north an…

From Tesla to tourism, from the Underground Railroad to the Manhattan Project, not to mention daredevils, the Local History department of the Niagara Falls Public Library has information on it all. And soon the public will be able to see it for more hours each week. Starting Oct. 2, the library's Local History department, which in recent years had opened its wealth o…

Bill Bradberry sits in the quiet gazebo at Heritage Park, under the eye of the Turtle building, and casts his mind back in time. In his imagination, it's 1850 or so. Directly in front of him is the railroad stop that brings visitors to Niagara Falls, many of them to the impressive, modern Cataract House, just steps away. Some of the visitors come from slave states; some…