History - The Buffalo News

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 24, 1917: * The fight against the International Railway company for better street car service is likened to David and Goliath in a front-page editorial cartoon. Membership was growing in a citizens organization to fight the company and demand better trolley service. * In World War I news, Germany sunk th…

In 1932, Buffalo was swept up in the celebration of the city’s centennial, and many groups and organizations that had existed through those 100 years took the opportunity to celebrate their own existence as well. The Buffalo Academy of Medicine — particularly proud that Buffalo’s first mayor, Ebenezer Johnson, was a medical doctor — wrote a lengthy history of th…

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 23, 1917: * The Citizens' League was formed to "put up a real fight for decent street car conditions in and near Buffalo." The group hoped to appeal to the state's Public Service Commission to investigate poor trolley conditions locally. * Both Britain and the U.S. were facing food shortages due to World …

A series of postcards showing off different portions of Main Street give a fantastic look back at the Village of Williamsville and how it’s changed since the 1960s. [Column: You live in Williamsville? No, You don't.] Government buildings on the east side of Main are a mix of old and new. The building that once housed the Amherst Police is now the Williamsvil…

Before they were even finished digging the Hamburg Canal, in 1849, the standing, fetid water in the half-dug ditch was blamed in part for a growing cholera crisis in what we now call the First Ward and Canalside areas. Originally conceived to help divert traffic away from the busy Erie Canal, soon the railroads were doing a good enough job of making the Hamburg Cana…

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 21, 1917: * President Woodrow Wilson has so far been tip-toeing around World War I. He was slated to appear before Congress to ask for more protection for "American seamen and ships against the German submarine menace." Meaning, he wants to fight Germany without actually declaring war. * Citizens were beg…

Had you walked into one of the 31 Your Host restaurants that filled the Niagara Frontier with a quick inexpensive meal and a pretty good cup of coffee, this is the menu you would have been handed as you slid into a booth or onto a stool at the counter. Alfred Durrenberger and Ross Wesson started the Your Host empire with a hot dog stand on Delaware Avenue in Kenmore…

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 20, 1917: * The 74th Infantry – local soldiers who were stationed at the Texas-Mexico border – returned home to great fanfare. Gov. Whitman, Mayor Fuhrman, visiting evangelist Billy Sunday and other local officials were all on hand to greet the troops. The articles describes the patriotic scene: "Whistl…

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 19, 1917: * The street car controversy continued in Western New York. After a public meeting attended by 500 angry passengers "forced to endure disgraceful service," a survey of the trolley service was planned. The Buffalo Evening News took credit for the progress so far: "It is a fact, however, that the h…

Inside the Market Arcade, a frosted-glass skylight stretches over three levels of shops and offices, creating one of Buffalo's most unusual and decorative spaces. Twin facades of terra cotta and brick on Main and Washington streets feature tall Corinthian columns, rounded arches, sculpted bison heads, palladian windows and egg-and-dart molding. [PHOTO GALLERY: A Clos…

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 17, 1917: * Five hundred "utterly disgusted" people attended a hearing on the "abominable" trolley car service that was the main mode of transportation around Western New York. The main event of the hearing was from attorney Philip A. Sullivan, who told the following tale: "We may have soft talk and subter…

Tens of millions of dollars into a decade-long renovation, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Darwin Martin House is among the crown jewels in Buffalo’s resurgence in architectural tourism. Wright called the home his “opus” and considered it one of his great designs, but as it was being built in 1905, not everyone in Buffalo felt that way. Those feelings were reflected in the…

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 16, 1917: * A public hearing is set to discuss the poor trolley car service in Western New York. The Buffalo Evening News does its best to attract a big crowd: "If some of the women, school teachers and others, who have suffered will be brave enough to appear, the case against this heartless corporation will…

Victor Hugo’s was a mainstay restaurant at Delaware Avenue and Edward Street for a generation, from 1945 to 1977. The family of owner Hugo DiGiulio was involved the management of many of Buffalo’s night spots and hotels, including the attached Victor Hugo Hotel, DiGiulio’s Club 31 on Johnson Park and the Hotel Buffalo – which stood at the corner of Washington an…