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If you love to write as much as you love the rich history of the Buffalo Niagara region, we'd like to hear from you. Steve Cichon, who has been the heart and soul of [BN] Chronicles for nearly three years, is moving on to more political pastures. The News is looking for a freelance writer to continue Cichon's excellent work through eight to 10 articles a month, conti…

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of March 22, 1917: • President Woodrow Wilson was preparing his "war address" to Congress. The article sets the nation's tone: "It is realized that between now and the assembling of Congress are days pregnant with tremendous import to the United States." • Famed national evangelist Billy Sunday, who was enjo…

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of March 21, 1917: * A special session of Congress was called to take action against Germany. It was expected that the U.S. would declare war against Germany and thereby enter World War I. * Over 300 employees at the Curtiss Aeroplane company at Niagara and West Ferry streets walked out. The strikers demanded in…

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of March 20, 1917: * President Woodrow Wilson was expected to submit his plan for war to Congress. A state of war had practically existed for some time as German submarines openly fired on American ships, but the U.S. was not yet an official part of World War I. * The Secretary of the Navy ordered recruiting offi…

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of March 19, 1917: * "Virtual state of war is forced by Germany," the headline screams. After three U.S. ships were sank by German submarines, President Woodrow Wilson was on the cusp of war after his policy of armed neutrality failed. It was widely believed that the United States' entering World War I was imminent.…

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of March 17, 1917: * After the Russian revolution, the czar who fled the country declared: "May God help Russia." A formal organization of the government as a republic was expected. * President Woodrow Wilson hoped to avert a railroad strike with mediation. Samuel Gompers, the famous head of the AFL-CIO, was nowh…

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of March 16, 1917: * Czar Nicholas fled Russia a day after revolutionaries took the capital of Petrograd. A new ministry of the people was appointed to govern the country. * Railroad workers were on the verge of a strike after negotiations failed. It was speculated that President Woodrow Wilson would have to step…

This photo looking at Main and Terrace from Washington Street sometime around 1895 offers some great context to help place where some of the structures of the past stood in reference to today’s landmarks. The Main and Terrace crossing of the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad was built in 1895 by Dwyer and Huntington of 379 Main St., and 122 years later, the v…

A snowstorm and a couple of jackknifed tractor-trailers had Sheridan Drive backed up from just after Harlem Road all the way to Niagara Falls Boulevard in this early 1960s photo. The “C. Hettinger for Rambler” car dealership is in the foreground on the right – today, it’s about where Northtown Kia and Northtown Mazda are located. Charles Hettinger opened for bus…

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of March 14, 1917: * The American steamship Algonquin was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine while sailing to London. Luckily, there were no injuries. * Representatives from the major national railroads met to demand an eight-hour day. Plans for a strike were formed, but a peaceful resolution was hoped for…

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News of March 13, 1917: * President Woodrow Wilson proposed a peace plan to end World War I. Citizens of war-torn countries were without food, and there was growing restlessness and a "growing belief that neither side can achieve an overwhelmingly victory." * The state public service commission decided to take action …

A winter storm is bearing down on Western New York — and in a bizarre coincidence, it's coming on the 24th anniversary that a deadly storm buried much of the East Coast. As Accuweather remembers it: "The Blizzard of '93 killed more than 300 people and dumped more than 20 inches of snow across a wide corridor of the Appalachians and Northeast. Fierce winds blew snow…

During the summer of 1969, 14 cases of young people being admitted to the hospital for drug-triggered attacks of terror and depression were directly linked to the ongoing “hippie gatherings” in Delaware Park. It was usually about 200 young people at “the nightly gathering of hippies in Delaware Park near the Albright-Knox.” “Some hippies create light shows …