Jerry Zremski - The Buffalo News

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Jerry Zremski

Jerry Zremski is the Washington bureau chief for The Buffalo News. He joined the News in 1984 as a business reporter and moved to Washington in 1989. Zremski served as president of the National Press Club in 2007 and won a Nieman fellowship in journalism at Harvard University in 1999. A native of Elkland, Pa., he is a graduate of Syracuse University.


Taylor Devices Inc., a North Tonawanda-based defense contractor and industrial parts manufacturer, is for sale."The state of the company is that we're concerned. The bank expressed that to us," Chairman Paul H. Taylor told shareholders at the annual meeting Wednesday in the Grand Island Holiday Inn.As a result, Taylor Devices has discussed a potential acquisition with…

POISON never tasted this good. According to a recently published study, the anti-takeover tactic called the "poison pill" actually might boost stock prices -- which is exactly the opposite of what the tactic's critics have said it does. The study, by the New York investor relations firm of Georgeson & Co. Inc., shows that stocks equipped with poison pills outperfor…

Servotronics Inc. of Cheekto waga, the target of an angry attack from a shareholder last week, this week announced some good news: up to $5.9 million in new con tracts and the settlement of a law suit. The company, criticized at its annual meeting last week for its recent sluggish earnings perfor mance, said it has signed an agree ment with General Dynamics Corp. t…

IT SEEMS, in this day and age, that the little investor never gets a break.Why, even that old standby, the dividend reinvestment plan, isn't what it used to be -- and all because of those bad big investors.Slowly but surely, dividend reinvestment plans are ceasing to be as great a bargain as they once were. Those plans still allow investors to buy stock directly from …

Downtown Buffalo hotel operators don't want to see 1988 end -- or 1989 and 1990 begin. Fresh from what is, by all accounts, the best year they've experienced in memory, hotel operators wor ry that their gains could be short-lived. Turmoil at the Buffalo Convention and Visitors Bureau, along with increased competition, could spell trouble for the future.First the go…

You don't need anybody to tell you this, but there's only so much money in this world. And if you want this world to be good to you, you have to spend your share wisely.Which raises the question: What, in God's name, is corporate America thinking?Companies are spending not only their own share, but billions in borrowed money, for the curious purpose of buying each oth…

Astronics Corp. of Orchard Park Monday announced a net loss for the third quarter, due in large part to the moving of a prod uct line from Ohio to East Aurora.The net loss for the quarter ended Sept. 30 totaled $84,000, equal to a loss of 2 cents a share, compared to a net profit of $63,000, or a gain of 2 cents a share, a year earlier. Sales for the quarter increased…

IT'S THAT time of year again, when investors think of selling their stocks not because they're dogs, but because they're worried about being dogged by the tax man.This year, as always, the same general rule applies: Don't sell stocks just to dodge taxes. But investors do have a new worry in 1988: Will the tax man take a bigger bite next year than this year, and if so,…

Multibillion dollar mergers make all the headlines, but it's just as good a time to make smaller business deals. That's the message accountants from Deloitte Haskins & Sells and attorneys from Moot & Sprague brought to a seminar on mergers and acquisitions at the Buffalo Club Tuesday."The size of some of these deals is, by a mere mortal's standards, unbelieveable,"…

Mark IV Industries Inc. of Am herst -- which is noted for buying the stock of other companies -- now has a major company buying its stock. The Scottish Amicable Life As surance Society of Glasgow, Scot land, announced Monday that it, along with three subsidiaries, has acquired 565,800 shares of Mark IV -- amounting to 6.1 percent of the outstanding total.Executives…

Control of the Kittinger Co., the renowned Buffalo-based furni ture maker, is about to change hands for the fourth time in five years, as its parent company agreed Sunday to be acquired by Maytag Corp.The board of directors of Chi cago Pacific Corp., which pur chased Kittinger from General Mills Inc. in August 1986, and Maytag's board have approved a merger, the compa…

There may or may not be a recession in late 1989, but one thing seems certain: The economy won't keep growing as it's been growing. That's the message Albert F. DePrince Jr., chief economist at Marine Midland Bank, delivered Wednesday at a meeting of the Northeast Classified Advertising Managers Association at the Hyatt Regency Buffalo."The economic expansion is certa…

Hugh A. Johnson Jr. has some advice for investors who still are struggling with what happened a year ago today. "Forget it," says Johnson, chief investment officer at the First Al bany Corp. stock brokerage. "It doesn't mean anything. Play like it never happened."Johnson, a Buffalo native, re turned home Tuesday to deliver a seminar for his company, and in an intervie…

Executives at the Permanent Savings Bank didn't know it at the time, but they know now: the stock market crash cost the bank upwards of $1 million.The Niagara Falls-based bank had been planning to sell stock to the public a year ago, but those plans came crashing down with the Dow Jones Industrial Average last Oct. 19. That prospective stock sale would have raised abo…