Jerry Sullivan - The Buffalo News

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Jerry Sullivan

Jerry Sullivan grew up in Newport, R.I., though some would dispute the grown-up part. He is a professional skeptic, thanks to 16 years as the lead columnist on the Bills. He loves the NBA, Strat-o-Matic baseball, Tom Waits and reading novels, along with the usual periodicals.


STANDINGS AND boxscores simply won't do anymore. To fully comprehend what has happened in the first half of the Major League Baseball season, you have to produce the X-rays. Here. Hold them up to the light and see if you can make any sense of this confusing mass of sprained wrists, torn shoulder muscles and wobbly knees.Managers no longer break out the scouting report…

II THINK IT'S about time for Tom Brokaw to do another documentary on blacks in sports. Only this time, he shouldn't try to prove why blacks are able to jump so high. He'd do society a much bigger service by examining the numerous ways in which they're starting to jump ahead.He could begin in Baltimore, where Frank Robinson has orchestrated one of the most remarkable o…

Somehow, you think of Cal Ripken Jr. as being older. Maybe it's the early intrusion of gray in his close-cropped hair. Perhaps it's because he has experienced a total evolution in the life of the Baltimore Orioles. He is the lone survivor of their championship squad of 1983, the only player who endured a great team's long, painful descent and is still around to enjoy …

It was two hours before the start of Thursday night's game and Lloyd Moseby was sitting by himself in the Blue Jays' clubhouse, shuffling a deck of cards. The game, fittingly enough, was solitaire.For more than a year now, Moseby has been a solitary prisoner of his own batting slump. His hitting stroke has deserted him, and so have most of his fans. He has become a re…

None of us, I suppose, has been taking the Baltimore Orioles all that seriously. We've observed them with a wary, dubious eye, as we would a baby attempting its first awkward steps, certain that at any moment they'll stumble.Well, the Orioles arrived at the season's midpoint Wednesday evening, and they are still standing. They're standing firmly atop the American Leag…

II HOPE THIS DOESN'T spoil anyone's holiday, but I have a confession to make. I'm one of those twisted people who always has liked John McEnroe.What's more, I can't think of a more appropriate way to celebrate our nation's independence than by following his exploits at Wimbledon, where McEnroe again is breathing life and personality into the world's most pretentious s…

I DON'T NEED to hear any more about this Pete affair. It doesn't matter how long he drags out the grisly proceedings, or how many soft-headed columnists cry for him to be let off with a one-year suspension. It doesn't even matter what Bart Giamatti, the commissioner, has to say. The guy is finished.Anyone who believes otherwise is missing one obvious point. As Rose su…

BACK IN THE mid-1970s, when he was a starter for the Texas Rangers, Jackie Brown had a season-long wager with one of his teammates, a pretty fair right-hander by the name of Ferguson Jenkins. Each was a no-nonsense sort of pitcher, and the idea was to see who could pitch the fastest complete game.Brown's philosophy on pitching hasn't wavered much since then. It's pret…

CANISIUS BASKETBALL coach Marty Marbach has done his share of traveling for Doug West. Five years ago, as a young assistant at Villanova, he was Rollie Massimino's tireless foot soldier in a hot recruiting war for West, then a highly coveted high school star in Altoona, Pa. He could make the trip to Altoona with a blindfold over his eyes.Marbach still has a soft spot…

Maybe what they should do is have one patriotic Canadian citizen stationed on every green, equipped with hockey pads and a goalie's stick, kicking aside the birdie putts of frustrated Americans.Otherwise, they're pretty much defenseless. Every year at this time, the Canadian Open becomes a U.S. occupation. The hotshot American golfers invade this nation's soil, not to…

AT A FEW minutes after six Saturday night, Ron Guidry finished running his outfield sprints and began making his way back to the Columbus dugout. And what a long, slow walk it was. Guidry made certain of that by strolling along the left-field line, where the fans in Pilot Field had congregated by the dozens, holding out baseballs, scorecards and random scraps of paper…

Joe Hahn sat behind his desk in the maintenance building at Oak Hill Country Club, sounding like a man who had hosted a big party and awakened to find that his guests had tracked mud all through the house.Hahn, the 48-year-old grounds superintendent at Oak Hill, has been through this before. The Buffalo native has handled eight championship golf tournaments since movi…

On the final day of the U.S. Open, Oak Hill got its revenge. Conspiring with the wind and the sun, it waged mischief with the world's best golfers and brought most of them to their knees.Going into this tournament, a lot of people had paid homage to Oak Hill by predicting par golf might well be enough to win. But 21 players broke par in Thursday's soggy opening round …

Scott Simpson might well be the most religious player on the PGA Tour, and he would surely be the last to take comfort in the misfortunes of his fellow man.But there must have been times Sunday when Simpson, his usually solid golf game deserting him, looked over at his playing partner and gave quiet thanks that at least he wasn't Tom Kite.In a sense, Kite was Simpson'…

P.J. Boatwright still was half asleep when he approached the stately entrance to the Oak Hill Country Club at 7 a.m. Saturday. The sight that awaited him as he drove through the gates opened his eyes good and wide."When I saw that Mississippi River going by the eighth tee, it kind of woke me up," the U.S. Open's executive director said. "Our original prognosis was we …