Share this article

print logo

Ellen Przepasniak

Ellen Przepasniak is a digital content editor. She has previously worked as a writer at The Times, Artvoice and Boston's Weekly Dig and was the features editor at The Post-Journal. She earned a master's degree in journalism at Boston University and a bachelor's degree in English at SUNY Fredonia.


History

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 17, 1917: * Five hundred "utterly disgusted" people attended a hearing on the "abominable" trolley car service that was the main mode of transportation around Western New York. The main event of the hearing was from attorney Philip A. Sullivan, who told the following tale: "We may have soft talk and subterf…

History

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 16, 1917: * A public hearing is set to discuss the poor trolley car service in Western New York. The Buffalo Evening News does its best to attract a big crowd: "If some of the women, school teachers and others, who have suffered will be brave enough to appear, the case against this heartless corporation will…

History

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of Feb. 15, 1917: * A trolley expert is expected to visit Buffalo in response to the outcry over inadequate street car service in Western New York. International Railway, the company that operates the trolleys that are the main source of transportation locally, isn't making necessary improvements. The Buffalo Evenin…

History

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News from Feb. 14, 1917: * Inadequate trolley service in Buffalo has been a hot topic. The company that runs the street cars promised improvements that never happened and the Buffalo Evening News urged all citizens to write the state's Public Service Commission to take action. Archer A. Landon, president of the Buffalo C…

History

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News from Feb. 13, 1917: In January 1917, the International Railway promised the area more street cars, better service and improved conditions. Dozens of street cars ran across Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Lockport, the Tonawandas, Lancaster and Depew — they were the main mode of local transportation. The Buffalo Evening News…

History

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News from Feb. 12, 1917: * A German raider took 72 Americans as hostages and are being held in Berlin. In return, Americans have sequestered the German ships and interned their crews. The U.S. and Germany are at a bypass, both waiting for each other to release the hostages first. * Local manufacturing is taking a blow…

History

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News from Feb. 10, 1917: * President Woodrow Wilson isn't ready to enter World War I yet, leaving the next move up to Germany. Each day brings increased fear that more lives will be lost from Germans sinking American ships. * The manager of the Buffalo Bisons and his wife narrowly escaped a fire at the Lenox Hotel in …

History

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News from Feb. 9, 1917: * As submarine warfare rages on around the globe, the U.S. is angry, but not taking action yet. President Woodrow Wilson said he's waiting for an overt act by the Germans before he enters World War I. In the meantime, American liners remain in danger after the California was sunk by a German torpe…

History

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News from Feb. 8, 1917: * As Germany practiced unrestricted submarine warfare around the globe, the U.S. watched and waited. As the headline screams: "The president will not be hurried into conflict." The U.S. wouldn't officially enter World War I until April. * On the morning of Feb. 8, a large crowd gathered at the …

History

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News from Feb. 7, 1917: * German submarines are blockading the path of American ships to England. The U.S. government maintains this is illegal, but the Germans will not budge. The American liner St. Louis has been waiting to sail to England and could be attacked. International tensions are rising as the article states: …

History

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News from Feb. 6, 1917: * Two days after President Woodrow Wilson declared a diplomatic break with Germany, a German submarine shelled an open boat, killing an African-American sailor. The headline: "Tension increases in Washington at the apparent disregard by Germany of Wilson's warning and officials wait anxiously for …

History

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News from Feb. 5, 1917: * President Woodrow Wilson is hoping to avoid hostilities as the U.S. prepares for a diplomatic break with Germany. The U.S. Embassy is awaiting instructions after President Wilson stated his intentions to sever ties before a joint session of Congress the previous day. The article reads: "Presiden…

History

Believe it or not, visitors to Niagara Falls used to be able to walk on the ice bridges that form naturally at the base of the cataracts. The ice bridges form every winter, typically in January, when Lake Erie is frozen over. Winds push blocks of ice down the Niagara River and over the falls where they freeze into a large chunk. In the 1800s and 1900s, ice bridges pr…

History

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News from Feb. 3, 1917: * "BREAK WITH KAISER," the headline screams. President Woodrow Wilson has finally decided to break diplomatic relations with Germany, following unrestricted submarine attacks. President Wilson delivered the famous message to a joint session of Congress, saying, "We shall not believe that they are …

History

Here are some highlights from the Buffalo Evening News from Feb. 2, 1917: * A huge explosion in Chicago due to a "gas blast" leaves many buildings destroyed and people trapped under the debris. * Americans are still waiting for a response from President Woodrow Wilson on whether he will break ties with Germany and enter World War I. One story above the fold says, "Wh…