Rock & Roll Hall of Fame's most egregious (and bizarre) snubs - The Buffalo News

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Rock & Roll Hall of Fame's most egregious (and bizarre) snubs

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame dropped its initial list of nominees for the class of 2018 on Thursday, and took a few steps toward soothing some old wounds by compiling a fair and balanced roster

Fans of the Moody Blues, Judas Priest and Kate Bush have been clamoring for their heroes' induction for years, and Thursday's announcement brought them to the cusp of such a realization. (The nominee list will be whittled down significantly in December, but you can protect your favorites among the nominees by casting your own vote.

Fairness and a sense of balance would seem to be informing the picks this year, and that's certainly a step in the right direction for frustrated fans and skeptics.

However, as many readers have pointed out to me over the years, the Rock Hall has some egregious snubs to account for, and for many of these readers, those snubs make the Hall a bit of a joke.

Here are a few of the least explicable snubs. All of these artists have been eligible for long enough to make this feel somewhat personal. And all of them changed the shape of popular music through their work.

Rock Hall's list of 2018 nominees is close to perfect

Todd Rundgren. Years eligible: 22. Likelihood of Induction: Low. Rundgren has made a career out of shunning the mainstream. The Hall doesn't tend to reward such behavior.

Jethro Tull. Years eligible: 35. Likelihood of Induction:  Very low. Tull is not considered cool, for some reason that apparently only "Rolling Stone" publisher Jann Wenner understands.

Phish. Years eligible: 6. Likelihood of Induction:  Medium. The Hall doesn’t seem to like jam bands too much. But the Grateful Dead are in there, so there's a chance.

Iron Maiden. Years eligible: 12. Likelihood of Induction: High, if the Hall knows what's good for it. They're finally beginning to acknowledge metal.

Warren Zevon. Years eligible: 22. Likelihood of Induction: High. Zevon's music sounds like Randy Newman on a whiskey and Quaalude bender. The Hall won’t be able to resist for too long.

King Crimson. Years eligible: 23. Likelihood of Induction: Low. Too brilliant, not mainstream enough for the Hall's tastes.

Television. Years eligible: 16. Likelihood of Induction: High. The Hall seems to understand the significance of 70s NYC punk/art-rock.

Emerson Lake & Palmer. Years eligible: 22. Likelihood of Induction: Low. See King Crimson, above.

Jane's Addiction. Years eligible: 5. Likelihood of Induction: High. The Hall seems to look kindly on the grunge/alt-rock era.

Thin Lizzy. Years eligible: 22. Likelihood of Induction: Medium. Lizzy fans are a vocal bunch, and they've been making noise about this dis for years. The Hall might give in, eventually.

Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds. Years eligible: 8. Likelihood of Induction: Low. Too dark, too wordy, too edgy, not mainstream enough.

Slayer. Years eligible: 8. Likelihood of Induction: High. See Iron Maiden, above.

Motorhead. Years eligible: 14. Likelihood of Induction: High. The prospect of Lemmy's ghost haunting the Hall will likely scare them into nominating his band.

Bjork. Years eligible: 14. Likelihood of Induction: High. The Hall will likely wipe this egg off its face within a year or two.

Devo. Years eligible: 14. Likelihood of Induction:  Medium. Devo is weird and eccentric, but Devo also sold a lot of albums, so there's a chance.

The Pixies. Years eligible: 6. Likelihood of Induction: High. I mean, c'mon!

Roxy Music. Years eligible: 19. Likelihood of Induction: Low, I suspect. And I just don't understand it. This should be a no-brainer.

Sonic Youth. Years eligible: 10. Likelihood of Induction: High. This just makes no sense.

The Cure. Years eligible: 14. Likelihood of Induction: Medium. The Hall is not exactly goth-friendly, but the Cure sold too many albums to be ignored forever.

The Smiths. Years eligible: 8. Likelihood of Induction: High. Fans will demand it.

One last one: The Award for Musical Excellence needs to be given to Carol Kaye. The brilliant bassist played on some of the most iconic recordings of the 20th century, during sessions with Phil Spector and Brian Wilson.

email: jmiers@buffnews.com

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