• Published

Rejection of pipeline was a serious mistake

It’s no surprise to me that National Fuel Gas Co. was recently rejected to build the Northern Access pipeline from Pennsylvania to Canada. Even though National Fuel seemed to have done its homework by complying with the numerous Department of Environmental Conservation requests, it just didn’t get it right. According to Gov. Andrew Cuomo and DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos, National Fuel failed to meet New York’s strict water quality standards.

I wonder why there was no uproar from Albany when on June 3, 2016, the Route 219 bridge was imploded and allowed to fall into Cattaraugus Creek. It is a very important waterway that provides recreation for all of Western New York, an important source of water for the surrounding communities and the Native American reservation as it empties into Lake Erie.

The DEC restricts National Fuel delivery rates with the lowest in all of the nation. As a consumer I like that, but National Fuel must profit from the service it offers or its footprint will become smaller in New York State, much to our detriment. Maybe that’s what the environmentalists want.

Several months ago, the Constitution Pipeline was rejected by Cuomo after thoughtful consideration. His inaction will continue to force communities in the northeastern U.S. to use heavy fuel oil, remnants of nuclear and solar and wind energy. This choice was also made in the last century for electric utilities along the East Coast, from Maine to Florida, to use heavy fuel oil to generate electricity. In the 1900s it was economical at 15 to 25 cents per gallon coming by tanker from South America, Africa and the Middle East.

Now it’s a hardship and expensive. Cuomo had an opportunity then to help our Northeastern neighbors by allowing the building of the pipeline. But the environmentalists had his ear. And he may wonder why he continues to lose constituents.

Anthony F. Frandina

Derby

Click here to see the comments. Add yours now!