Front page, March 17, 1917: Blizzard threatens St. Patrick's Day parade - The Buffalo News

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Front page, March 17, 1917: Blizzard threatens St. Patrick's Day parade

Here are some highlights from The Buffalo Evening News of March 17, 1917:

* After the Russian revolution, the czar who fled the country declared: "May God help Russia." A formal organization of the government as a republic was expected.

* President Woodrow Wilson hoped to avert a railroad strike with mediation. Samuel Gompers, the famous head of the AFL-CIO, was nowhere to be seen for the talks. Gompers was a vocal supporter of an eight-hour day for railroad workers.

* Organizers of the St. Patrick's Day parade were worried a blizzard would cancel the afternoon parade, but marchers were determined to go ahead with the parade despite the forecast. At the time, the parade snaked through downtown Buffalo and elected officials and clergy didn't march in the parade. Rather, they watched from the steps of City and County Hall and the Franklin Street cathedral. The article reads, "Although all had wished for fairer weather, nary a downhearted lad was there anywhere."

* Mildred Getski, 30, was found dead in her East Eagle Street home with the rubber tube of a gas stove in her mouth. The article makes sure to point out that "the woman did not make her home with her husband."

Here's the front page of The Buffalo Evening News from March 17, 1917:

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