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Farmer who thinks politicians are full of manure erects politically incorrect outhouse

The 17-foot-tall outhouse on Stephen Fitzpatrick's farm comes with a message that's more pungent than the smell you'd expect to be drifting from it.

In clear black lettering "POLITICIANS" is written on a sign on the upper level of the double-decker outhouse. "TAXPAYERS" must use the potty directly underneath.

Fitzpatrick said he knew what he wanted to communicate: that politicians tend to - well, you know - dump on taxpayers.

"I've never trusted politicians. Just never had that trust," explained Fitzpatrick, 72, as he stood on his farm in Angola.

Fitzpatrick is a strong supporter of Donald Trump. He has a Trump sign in his front lawn and his maroon Ford F-250 pickup bears a Trump bumper sticker. Miniature American flags are planted along the farm's driveway next to a "Repeal The Safe Act" sign.

Fitzpatrick said this year's presidential race, which has seen its share of flying cow pies, inspired him, in part, to have the politically incorrect privy built.

While in the Southern Tier one day buying leather goods, Fitzpatrick hired an Amish farmer in Conewango Valley to build the pine outhouse for $700.

"It just came up in my head. Usually, I don't think on things too much. I just do them," said Fitzpatrick. "I told him I wanted a 5-foot-square, 17-foot-high, two-story outhouse."

The wooden latrine was built in about six days, and erected on Fitzpatrick's farm in June. Since then, at least 50 to 60 motorists have pulled up close to the edge of his farm to snap a picture of the outhouse, Fitzpatrick said.

Stephen Fitzpatrick is a 72-year-old Angola farmer who had a double-decker outhouse built on is property to show his displeasure with politicians. He suggests politicians would use the upper floor and the taxpayers would use the bottom. Fitzpatrick stood next to the outhouse on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. (Robert Kirkham/Buffalo News)

Stephen Fitzpatrick is a 72-year-old Angola farmer who had a double-decker outhouse built on is property to show his displeasure with politicians. He suggests politicians would use the upper floor and the taxpayers would use the bottom. Fitzpatrick stood next to the outhouse on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. (Robert Kirkham/Buffalo News)

Those photos found their way onto social media. Fitzpatrick's brother, Keith Fitzpatrick of Branson, Mo., learned about the outhouse after seeing a friend's photo online. He suspected the unusual structure just might belong to his brother.

"He called me up about six to eight weeks ago, and said, 'Hey, is that your farm?'" Stephen Fitzpatrick recalled with a laugh.

Fitzpatrick said his intention was to get voters to think.

"The sign is directed at Republicans, just as well as Democrats," Fitzpatrick said. "I hope people look at it and it just triggers them to think about politics."

Fitzpatrick is more familiar with B.S., or manure if you prefer, than most. Forty bison graze on his 225-acre farm on Pontiac Road, occasionally wandering close to where the outhouse stands.

He retired after a 37-year career with the Ford Stamping Plant, and now enjoys his bison farming. Fitzpatrick has been raising bison for 29 years, and selling their meat to friends and others for 20 of those. He got involved in bison farming in the mid-'80's after his buddy's wife insisted her husband get rid of his five bison. Fitzpatrick bought them for $6,000. As his herd grew, he expanded the farm from an initial 86 acres to 225.

For now, the inside of his double-decker outhouse doesn't include toilet seats. It doesn't sit above a hole in the ground. There's none of the accessories you might need in such a place. But it does have a ladder inside to climb to the upper level.

Fitzpatrick promised that one day soon, the outhouse will be made "usable."

After the November election, Fitzpatrick said he plans to lay the outhouse down on a trailer and move it elsewhere on his farm and to other spots, where he will open the upper shutters and use it as a hunting perch.

Fitzpatrick said he has also thought about moving the structure near his barn so he can really use it while he does his farm chores.

"It will be 'usable,' not only for a deer stand, but as a point of relief," Fitzpatrick promised.

email: krobinson@buffnews.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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