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WNY’s all-time Summer Olympians: The list will surprise

A capsule look at Summer Olympians who were born or lived in Western New York. The list is courtesy of Greater Buffalo Sports Hall of Fame committee members Denny Lynch, Ron Carr and Chuck Frawley from their research for an upcoming book about WNYers in the Summer and Winter Olympics.

Abdullah

Born in Canada, he was purchased by Royalton residents Terry and Sue Williams in 1973. He was a Trakehner stallion, considered by many to be the best of his breed to compete in show jumping. In the 1984 Olympics (Los Angeles), with rider Conrad Homfeld, Abdullah won a gold medal in team show jumping and a silver medal in individual show jumping.

Charles Edwin Ackerly

Born in 1898 in Cuba, N.Y., he attended Cuba High School and Cornell University. The freestyle featherweight wrestler won a gold medal in the 1920 Olympics (Antwerp). He died in 1982.

Claude Allen

Born in Olean in 1885, he competed in the pole vault for Syracuse University. He finished fifth in the pole vault in the 1904 Olympics (St. Louis). He became the basketball coach at Niagara University (1909-10).

John Allen

Born in Buffalo in 1926, he attended Kensington High School. He finished 24th in the men’s 50-kilometer walk in the 1960 Olympics (Rome).

Anita Alvarez

Born in Kenmore, she attended Kenmore West before moving to California to train for the U.S. national team . She joined with partner Mariya Koroleva to form a synchronized swimming duet team that will compete in Rio. She is the daughter of Karen Alvarez, a former Kenmore West athlete and an All-America synchronized swimmer at the University of Arizona.

Matt Anderson

Born in West Seneca, he attended West Seneca West before leading Penn State to the NCAA volleyball championship. He played on Team USA volleyball in the 2012 Olympics (London), finishing tied for fifth, and is back for Rio. He plays professionally in Europe.

Jimmy Arias

Born in Grand Island, the child prodigy as a baseliner turned pro at age 16 in 1980. He retired from the pro tour in 1994, having amassed a 286–223 singles record. He represented the USA in tennis in the 1984 Olympics (Los Angeles), when tennis was a demonstration sport. He served as an analyst for NBC’s coverage of tennis at the 2008 Olympics (Beijing).

Tom Beach

He grew up in Berkeley, Calif., but is listed on Olympic reference as being born in Buffalo. He competed in gymnastics in the 1976 Olympics (Montreal), finishing seventh in the men’s team all-around and 32nd in the men’s individual all-around.

Ed Book

Born in Buffalo, he attended McKinley High School and played basketball at Canisius College. He moved to New Zealand in 1994 to play basketball. He represented New Zealand in the 2004 Olympics (Athens), finishing 10th.

Peter Bos

Born in North Tonawanda in 1938, he attended the U.S. Naval Academy. He finished fifth in rowing in the men’s coxed eights with coxswain in the 1960 Olympics (Rome).

Marian Brackenbridge

Born in Buffalo, she moved to Pasadena, Calif., at age 6. She competed in the art competition at the 1932 Olympics (Los Angeles) in mixed sculpturing (tennis overhead smash). Art competitions were part of the Olympics from 1912-48.

John Bray

Born in Middleport in 1875, he attended Williams College as a track athlete. He won a bronze medal for the USA in the 1500-meter run at the 1900 Olympics (Paris). He died in 1945.

Alex Breckenridge

Born in Buffalo and raised in Scotland. He finished 30th in the men’s marathon in the 1960 Olympics (Rome).

George Breen

Attended Bishop Timon High and Cortland State. He was an outstanding rower at Timon and West Side Rowing Club. Breen also swam at Timon and later under legendary coach “Doc” Councilman at Cortland State and made two Olympic teams (1956 and ’60) . He won four Olympic swimming medals: one silver in the 4x200-meter relay and two bronze (400 freestyle and 1500 freestyle) in 1956 (Melbourne), and bronze in the 1500 freestyle in 1960 (Rome).

Michael Broderick

Born in Ireland, he emigrated to the USA and became one of the founders and president of the West Side Rowing Club (for 37 years) . He attended the 1936 Olympics (Berlin) as a manager of the U.S. rowing team (four-oared shell without coxswain), which featured Alfred Sapecky, James Thomson, Eugene Fruehauf and George Hague.

Sandy Campbell

Listed as being born in Buffalo, he finished 28th in the men’s kayak singles in the 1972 Olympics (Munich).

Neil Campbell

Born in Buffalo, his family moved to St. Catharines, Ont., when he was a toddler . He competed in rowing for Canada in the 1964 Olympics (Tokyo), finishing 11th in the men’s coxed fours.

Ronald Cardwell

Born in Buffalo, he attended Lafayette High School and Boston University. A member of West Side Rowing Club, he rowed in the men’s four-oared shell with coxswain at the 1956 Olympics (Melbourne) with Erwin Fox, Douglas Turner, James McMullen, James Wynne and coxswain Edward Masterson. Coached by Irv Truebel, they lost to the Soviet Union in the semifinal.

Connie Caruccio (Lenz)

Born in Allegany, she was one of the youngest women gymnasts at the 1936 Olympics (Berlin). She made the 1948 Olympics (London) as Connie Lenz. Her best years were before the war, when she won eight national titles – two in the all-around, three in floor exercise and one each in the other events. She served on the U.S. Olympic Gymnastic Committee until 1960. She died in 1980.

Ray Castilloux

Born in Paspébiac, Québec, in 1934, he moved to Buffalo at age 14. He made the U.S. Olympic cycling team as an individual road racer in 1964 (Tokyo). He competed but did not finish in the men’s race. He also raced in the 1968 Olympics (Mexico City). He died in 2010.

Darren Chiacchia

Born in Hamburg, he attended Frontier High School. He made the equestrian team for the 2004 Olympics (Athens), finishing 12th in the men’s individual three-day event. He earned a bronze medal in mixed three-day team event.

Jimmy Clark

The Jamestown High School athlete was an amateur middleweight boxer in the 1936 Olympics (Berlin). He won five of six fights in the Olympics, losing a controversial decision in the semifinals.

John Collier

Born in Buffalo, he grew up in Providence, R.I., where his father was a historian at Brown University. He won a bronze medal in the 110-meter hurdles at the 1928 Olympics (Amsterdam).

Steven Collins

A 1980 graduate of Niagara-Wheatfield, he qualified for the U.S. rapid fire pistol team for the 1980 Olympics at age 17 but did not compete because of a U.S. boycott of the Moscow Games. He did not qualify for the 1984 Olympics. He was among the first inductees into the Empire State Games Hall of Fame and held the record for winning the most gold medals (15) at the state competition. He died Jan. 15, 2006.

Steven Coppola

Born in Buffalo, he started rowing at Canisius High School (graduated 2002) and continued to row for four years at Princeton University. He made the men’s eight crew for the 2008 Olympics (Beijing) that took a bronze medal in the 2000-meter race.

Dick Cortright

Born in Buffalo, he attended Kensington High School. He was the first American to make three straight Olympics: 1952 (Helsinki), 1956 (Melbourne) and 1960 (Rome).

Bill Coulthard

Born in Erie County, he moved to Canada at a young age. He played basketball for Canada in the 1952 Olympics (Helsinki), tying for 13th.

Charles Meldrum Daniels

Born in 1885 in Dayton, Ohio, he married Florence Goodyear and in 1909 moved to Buffalo, where he would live until 1953. His grandfathers were famous Buffalo judge Charles Daniels and Alexander Meldrum of Adam, Meldrum and Anderson fame. In the 1904 Olympics (St. Louis), he won five medals, including gold in the 220-yard freestyle, the 440-yard freestyle and the 4x50-yard freestyle relay. He also won silver in the 100-yard freestyle and bronze in the 50-yard freestyle. He competed in the 1908 Olympics (London), winning gold in the 100-meter freestyle and bronze in the 4 x200 freestyle relay. He died in 1973 and is buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery.

Ike Diogu

Full name is Ikechukwu Somtochukwu Diogu. His parents emigrated from Nigeria in 1980. He was born in Buffalo in 1983, but moved to Garland, Texas, while in middle school. He played basketball at Arizona State and also played for the Nigerian team in the 2012 Olympics (London), finishing 10th. He was drafted and played in the NBA.

Richard Edmonds

Born in Freedom in 1947 , he rowed in the men’s coxed pair boat at the 1968 Olympics (Mexico City), finishing fifth.

Bridget Finn

Born in Tonawanda, she attended City Honors. She moved to California in 1991 so she could join a synchronized swim club. She was a standout synchronized swimmer at Stanford (graduated 1997). She took fifth in the 2000 Olympics (Sydney) in the women’s team event.

Jeffery Float

Born in Buffalo, he moved to California by age 7 . He won a gold in the 1984 Olympics (Los Angeles) in the men’s 4x200-meter freestyle. He finished fourth in the 200-meter freestyle.

Carl Flynn

Coached the men’s four-oared shell without coxswain from West Side Rowing Club in the 1936 Olympics (Berlin). The scull included Eugene Fruehauf, Alfred Sapecky, James Thomson and George Hague.

Robert James Foth

The competitive shooter attended Clarence High School. He won a silver medal at the 1992 Olympics (Barcelona) in the 50-meter rifle (three positions) event. He is the coach of the Paralympics shooting team.

William Frazer

Born in Niagara Falls, he moved to numerous places due to his military service. He finished 11th in shooting in the 1924 Olympics (Paris) competing in the men’s rapid-fire pistol, 25 meters.

Norman Freeman

Born in Niagara Falls, he competed in sailing in the mixed two-person heavyweight dinghy in the 1976 Olympics (Montreal) with Jack Mathias, finishing sixth.

Eugene Fruehauf

Born in Buffalo, he attended Bennett High School. He competed with fellow West Side Rowing Club members Alfred Sapecky, George Hague, James Thomson, alternate Charles Fries and manager Michael Broderick in the 1936 Olympics (Berlin) in the four-oared shell without coxswain

Clifford C. Furnas

Participated in the 1920 Olympics (Antwerp), where he ran the 5000-meter race and earned a bronze medal. He became the ninth chancellor of the University of Buffalo in 1954. After guiding the university through the merger process with the State University of New York in 1962, Furnas became the first president of the State University of New York at Buffalo. He died in 1969.

Mark Gangloff

Born in Buffalo, he moved to Stow, Ohio, as a youngster. He went to Auburn University, where he was a 12-time All-American, swimming in the breaststroke events. He won gold in the 2004 Olympics (Athens) and 2008 Olympics (Beijing) as part of the U.S. 400-meter medley relay team. He holds the U.S. record in the 50-meter breast (26.86).

Ed Don George

Born in North Java, he attended Canisius High School and starred in football and wrestling at St. Bonaventure before transferring to Michigan, where he was a collegiate heavyweight champion. He earned a silver medal in wrestling in the 1928 Olympics (Amsterdam).

Craig Gilbert

Born in Buffalo in 1956, he attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point where he played football and basketball. He played on the U.S. national handball team from 1978-84 and finished ninth at the 1984 Olympics (Los Angeles).

Kathy Gleason (Jachter)

Born in Buffalo, she starred in gymnastics for the Buffalo Turners under coach Al Stumpf at Lafayette High and Buffalo State. Gleason-Jachter was a member of the U.S. Olympic team in 1968 (Mexico City).

Marquise Goodwin

The Buffalo Bills drafted the receiver in the third round in 2013. He played football and ran track at the University of Texas. He competed as a long jumper for the U.S. at the 2012 Olympics (London). He did not qualify for Rio.

Chad Green

Born in Dunkirk, he attended Mentor (Ohio) High School and the University of Kentucky. He was a member of the U.S. bronze-medal-winning baseball team at the 1996 Olympics (Atlanta). He went on to play in the Milwaukee Brewers chain.

Ignatius (Iggy) Gronkowski

Born in Buffalo, the great-great grandfather of New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski held several world records in cycling in the 1920s. He competed in the 1924 Olympics (Paris) in three events with no medals.

George Hague

Born in Buffalo in 1915, he competed in the 1936 Olympics (Berlin) as a member of the men’s four-oared shell without coxswain from West Side Rowing Club along with Alfred Sapecky, James Thomson and Eugene Fruehauf.

Steve Halaiko

The lightweight boxer from Auburn, N.Y. , won a scholarship to Cook Academy at Montour Falls, the oldest prep school in New York State. He organized Cook Academy’s first boxing team. He fought out of Buffalo as an amateur and won the 1928 national amateur lightweight title, which qualified him for the Olympics in Amsterdam. He won a silver medal.

James “Chick” Hewson

Born in Buffalo, he attended Riverside and rowed at West Side Rowing Club. He also won six AAU titles as a race walker between 1955 and ’58. He made the U.S. team for the 1956 Olympics (Melbourne) in the 25-kilometer walk and 50-kilometer walk. He took 17th in the 50 but let the runner-up in the 25 compete in his place.

Grace Jividen

Born in Buffalo, she attended Canisius College. She competed for the U.S. women’s judo team (women’s middleweight ) at the 1992 Olympics (Barcelona) and served as an alternate in 1996, 2000 and 2004.

Jake Kaminski

He attended Iroquois High School and took up archery at a young age. He competed at the 2012 Olympics (London) in the men’s team event and won a silver medal with his teammates Brady Ellison and Jacob Wukie. He will compete in Rio.

George Killian

A graduate of Northern Illinois University, he came to Buffalo to earn a Master’s Degree. In 1954 he became the athletic director and men’s basketball coach for then-Erie County Technical Institute (Erie Community College). He was a member of the United States Olympic Committee Board of Directors for 36 years and was a member of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) from 1996-98.

Robert J.H. Kiphuth

Born in Tonawanda, he became head swimming coach at Yale University, compiling a 528-12 record over 41 years. He was the U.S. Olympic men’s head coach in 1932 (Los Angeles), 1936 (Berlin) and 1948 (London). His 1948 team won 11 of 18 medals – six gold, four silver and one bronze.

Albert “Allie” Kruschel

Born in Buffalo in 1889, the cyclist earned a bronze medal in the 1912 Olympics (Stockholm) in the men’s road race team event and finished 13th in the men’s road individual. He became a professional and set records including the 25-mile speed record in 1917.

Christian Laettner

Raised in Angola, he attended Nichols School and Duke University. He was a member of the USA basketball Dream Team that won the 1992 Olympic gold medal in Barcelona. He played in the NBA.

Mel LaForme

Born in Buffalo, he rowed in the 1976 Olympics (Montreal) with Canada, finishing eighth in the men’s coxed eight. He also finished ninth with Canada in the men’s quadruple sculls in 1988 (Seoul). He made the 1980 Canadian Olympic Team but did not participate (boycott) and was an alternate for Canada in 1984 (Los Angeles).

William Leushner

The competitive rifle shooter moved to Buffalo from Ontario as a teenager. He joined the U.S. National Guard before winning the team military rifle gold medal at the 1908 Olympics (London) with the highest individual score in the competition at age 40. He won silver and two bronze medals in the 1912 Olympics (Stockholm) and finished without a medal in the 1920 Olympics (Antwerp).

Eddie Masterson

Born in Laconia, N.H., he moved to Buffalo and attended Buffalo Technical School (now Hutch Tech) and later Cornell. The West Side Rowing Club member was coxswain in the men’s four-oared shell with coxswain at the 1956 Olympics (Melbourne) with Erwin Fox, Douglas Turner, James McMullen and James Wynne. They lost to the Soviet Union in the semifinal.

John “Jake” Mathias

Born in Buffalo, he competed in sailing in the 1976 Olympics (Montreal) in the mixed two-person heavyweight dinghy with Norm Freeman. They finished sixth, only 1.5 seconds out of silver.

James McMullen

Born in Buffalo, he attended St. Joseph’s Collegiate Institute and the University of Pennsylvania. A member of West Side Rowing Club, he rowed in the men’s four-oared shell with coxswain at the 1956 Olympics (Melbourne) with Erwin Fox, Douglas Turner, James Wynne and coxswain Edward Masterson. They lost to the Soviet Union in the semifinal.

Michael Meeks

The Canisius College standout played basketball for Canada in the 2000 Olympics (Sydney), finishing seventh. He is a coach in Canada.

Herb Mols

Served as a Park School coach for 27 years, guiding six-man football, basketball, baseball and track. He served as manager of the U.S. men’s basketball team in 1972 Olympics (Munich). He was one of the founders of the Empire State Games and was a major reason why the ESG came to Buffalo in 1985.

Thomas Montemage

Attended Kensington High School. He made the U.S. Olympic cycling team in 1948 (London) and 1952 (Helsinki) in the team pursuit, 4000 meters, and in the individual road race in 1964 (Tokyo). He won several Empire State Games senior championships before he died in 2014.

Frank Mount Pleasant

A native of the Tuscarora Indian Reservation in Niagara County, he played college football at Carlisle Indian School where he was an All-American (second team) in 1905. He was a member of the track and field team at the 1908 Olympics (London), where he placed sixth in the long jump and triple jump.

Tom Murray

Born in Kenmore, he attended St. Joseph’s Collegiate Institute. He rowed in the 1996 Olympics (Atlanta), finishing 11th in the four-oared shell without coxswain.

Paula Jean Myers (Pope)

Born in Lackawanna, she moved to California and graduated from the University of Southern California in 1957. She won a silver medal in platform diving at the 1952 Olympics (Helsinki) and a bronze in the 1956 Olympics (Melbourne) as Paula Myers. She won a silver medal in springboard diving at the 1960 Olympics (Rome) as Paula Myers-Pope.

James Neil

Born in Buffalo in 1968, he attended Canisius High School. He rowed to fourth in the men’s four-oared shell with coxswain in the 1992 Olympics (Barcelona). He served as an alternate for the 1996 Olympics (Atlanta) .

Henry (Hank) Nichols

Niagara Falls native and Bishop Duffy graduate spent four decades with the NCAA as a basketball official and coordinator of basketball officials. He officiated two Olympic basketball tournaments, 1976 in Montreal and 1984 in Los Angeles.

Hugo Nicholson

Born in Kane, Pa., in 1898, he attended Syracuse University and moved to Jamestown, where he was an advertising executive. He competed in the 1932 Olympics (Los Angeles) in the mixed painting event. He did not medal. He died in Jamestown in 1972.

Cathleen O’Brien (Romani)

Grew up in Tonawanda. She became a synchronized swimmer under legendary coach Dorothy Sowers at the Tonawanda Aquettes Club. She earned a scholarship to the University of Michigan. She married an Italian and became the head coach of the Italian synchronized swimming team from 1985 to 1999, including the 1992 Olympics (Barcelona) and the 1996 Olympics (Atlanta). She lives in Italy.

Robert Perew

Born in Buffalo in 1923, he attended Lafayette High School and Yale University before serving in World War II. He began rowing at West Side Rowing Club in high school and was on the crew at Yale. He won bronze with the men’s four-oared shell without coxswain in the 1948 Olympics (London). He died in Denton, Texas, in 1999.

Frank Pierce

Born on the Cattaraugus Reservation in 1883, he was the first Native American to compete in the Olympics. He competed in men’s marathon in the 1904 Olympics (St. Louis) but did not finish as he was forced to drop out at the 20-mile mark, the result of race officials driving automobiles ahead of the runners, kicking up dust and making it impossible to breathe. He died in 1908.

Achille Porcasi

Born in Palermo, Italy, in 1864, he was a well-known musical conductor. He moved to Buffalo to organize and lead an Italian band named after himself. He later moved to St. Louis and finally California where he settled permanently. He competed in the mixed music competition during the 1932 Olympics (Los Angeles). He did not medal. He died in Los Angeles in 1941.

Herbert Putnam

Born in Fredonia, he attended Fredonia High School and Fredonia Normal School (now SUNY Fredonia). He competed in the 1912 Olympics (Stockholm) in the men’s 800 meters, finishing eighth overall. He also competed in the men’s 1,500 meters.

Emily Regan

Born in Buffalo, she rowed at Nichols School and Michigan State. Coached by Buffalo native Tom Terhaar, she will compete with the U.S. rowing team in Rio in the women’s eight.

Charles Reidpath

Born in Buffalo, he competed in track at Lafayette High School and Syracuse. He won a gold medal in the 400 meters in the 1912 Olympics (Stockholm), shattering the record in 48.2. He ran the anchor leg for the gold-medal-winning 400-meter relay.

Irene Robertson

Born in Batavia, the sprinter/hurdler competed in two Olympic Games (1956 Melbourne and 1960 Rome) but failed to make the finals in the high hurdles. She attended El Camino Junior College and represented the Los Angeles Athletic Club.

Scott Roop

Wrestled at Buffalo State (1972- 1974) and rowed varsity crew for the Bengals (1973-1975). He was awarded the 1981 Vesper Cup as outstanding person or crew in USA Rowing. He was varsity rowing coach at Brown University (1994-2001) and will coach the U.S. men’s double sculls in Rio.

Lou Rosselli

Won two New York State wrestling titles at Royalton-Hartland High School before earning All-American honors at Edinboro (Pa.). He competed in the men’s flyweight freestyle wrestling in the 1996 Olympics (Atlanta). The associate head wrestling coach at Ohio State, he was an assistant coach at the 2012 Olympics (London) and will coach in Rio.

Charles Rumsey

Born in Buffalo in 1879, he attended Nichols School and Harvard. He entered the 1928 Olympics (Amsterdam) in the arts competition in the mixed sculpture event.

Henry Russell

Born in Buffalo in 1904, he attended Cornell University as a sprinter on the track team. He made the U.S. Olympic team in 1928 (Amsterdam) and won a gold medal on the 4x100 relay team. He died in 1986.

Roy Saari

Born in Buffalo, he moved to California as a baby. He swam in the 1964 Olympics (Tokyo), winning team gold (4x200-meter relay) and silver (400 individual medley). He was the son of Urho “Whitey” Saari, the famous USA water polo coach who swam at Buffalo State.

Urho “Whitey” Saari

The son of Finnish immigrants was born in Buffalo in 1912 and was an outstanding swimmer at Hutchinson High School and Buffalo State (1935-39). He moved to California to do graduate work at UCLA and began coaching swimming and water polo at El Segundo Swim Club. He was the U.S. Olympic water polo coach in 1952 (Helsinki) and 1964 (Tokyo). He served as assistant coach/manager of the U.S. squad in the 1960 Olympics (Rome).

Alfred Sapecky

Born in New York City, he moved to Buffalo and attended Lafayette High School. He competed in the 1936 Olympics (Berlin) in the men’s four-oared shell without coxswain with fellow West Side Rowing Club members James Thomson, Eugene Fruehauf and George Hague.

Don Smith

Born in North Tonawanda in 1968, he attended St. Joseph’s Collegiate Institute and moved to Philadelphia after graduation. He participated in the 1996 Olympics (Atlanta) in the men’s coxed eight, finishing fifth. He switched to the men’s single sculls for the 2000 Olympics (Sydney), finishing eighth.

Ted Smith

Born in Cheektowaga, he competed in cycling in the 1948 Olympics (London) in the men’s team pursuit, 4,000 meters

Eugene Speicher

Born in Buffalo, he moved to New York City in 1907. He competed in the 1932 Olympics (Los Angeles) in the art competitions. He entered the mixed painting event with his work titled The Hunter.

Al Stumpf

He and his wife, Sally, were gymnastics coaches at the Buffalo Turners Club and helped develop Kathy Gleason into a collegiate gymnast and a 1968 Olympian. He was a coach and member of the U.S. Olympic Committee in 1968 (Mexico City) as a representative of the American Turners Association.

Jenn Stuczynski Suhr

A multi-sport star at Fredonia High School and the all-time leading basketball scorer at Robert Wesleyan College, she was a record-holder in five track events including the pole vault. As a senior in 2004 she came under the guidance of legendary pole vault coach Rick Suhr and advanced to become U.S. national indoor champion in 2005 and ’08 and outdoor champion in 2006-08. She set a U.S. outdoor pole-vault record and earned a silver medal in the 2008 Olympics (Beijing). Four years later in London she earned the Olympic gold medal with her jump of 15’9.” She will compete in Rio.

Tom Terhaar

Born in Buffalo, he attended St. Joseph’s Collegiate Institute and rowed at Rutgers University. He began his coaching career with the men’s lightweight team for five years at Columbia University and was named U.S. women’s team assistant coach from 1994-2000. He coached the women’s quadruple sculls to a fifth-place finish at the 2000 Olympics (Sydney). He became head coach of the U.S. women’s team in 2001. He led the women’s eight to a silver medal in the 2004 Olympics (Athens). His women’s eight won gold in 2008 (Beijing), and in 2012 (London) his women’s eight won gold and his women’s four took bronze. He is coaching in Rio.

James Thompson

Born in Glasgow City, Great Britain, he emigrated to the U.S. He competed with fellow West Side Rowing Club members Alfred Sapecky, Eugene Fruehauf and George Hague in the 1936 Olympics (Berlin) in the men’s four-oared shell without coxswain.

Douglas Turner

Attended Lafayette High School in Buffalo and was co-captain of the Brown University crew. He rowed in the men’s four-oared shell with coxswain at the 1956 Olympics (Melbourne) with James Wynne, Ronald Cardwell, James McMullen and coxswain Edward Masterson, losing to the Soviet Union in the semifinal. He became editor of the Courier Express and Washington Bureau Chief for The Buffalo News.

John Tuttle

Born in Alfred, he attended Alfred-Almond High School. He competed in the 1984 Olympics (Los Angeles), running the men’s marathon, but he did not finish (dehydration).

Tara VanDerveer

Born in Melrose, Mass., she moved to Niagara Falls at age 15 and attended Buffalo Seminary. She became a successful basketball coach at Sacred Heart Academy before moving on to Ohio State and Stanford. She coached the gold-medal-winning U.S. women’s basketball team in the 1996 Olympics (Atlanta).

Herbert Voelcker Jr.

Born in Tonawanda, he competed in shooting at the 1956 Olympics (Melbourne), finishing 10th in the men’s free rifle, 300-meter (three positions).

Sue Walsh

South Buffalo’s “Queen of the Backstrokers” was unbeaten throughout her swimming career at the University of North Carolina. She qualified for the U.S. Olympic team in 1980 (Moscow) but the U.S. boycotted the Games. She narrowly missed qualifying for the 1984 Olympic squad.

Jane Ward

Born in 1932, she grew up in Buffalo and attended Bennett High School and the University of Buffalo. She moved to California after college and took up volleyball. She served as captain of the U.S. women’s volleyball team at the 1964 Olympics (Tokyo), finishing fifth. She was the U.S. team captain in the 1968 Olympics (Mexico City), finishing eighth. She lives in Vista, Calif.

Frank Wendling

Born in 1897 and raised in Buffalo, he competed in the 1924 Olympics (Paris), finishing 16th in the men’s marathon. He finished third in the 1924 Boston Marathon and 10th in 1928.

Frank Wright

Born in South Wales in 1878, he went to Kenmore High School. He competed at Audubon Gun Club and made the U.S. team for the 1920 Olympics (Antwerp). He won a bronze medal in men’s trap shooting and a team gold medal in men’s trap shooting.

James Wynne

Born in Buffalo in 1937, he attended St. Joseph’s Collegiate Institute and rowed at the University of Pennsylvania. He was a member of West Side Rowing Club when it rowed in the men’s four-oared shell with coxswain at the 1956 Olympics (Melbourne) with Ronald Cardwell, Douglas Turner, James McMullen and coxswain Edward Masterson. They lost to the Soviet Union in the semifinal.

Louis Zamperini

Born in Olean in 1917, he moved to Torrance, Calif, at age 7. He competed in the 1936 Olympics (Berlin), finishing eighth in the men’s 5000-meter race. He carried the Olympic Torch at the 1984 Summer Olympics at Los Angeles and the 1998 Winter Games at Nagano, Japan. He was featured in a book and motion picture “Unbroken,” based on the torture he endured as a World War II prisoner in Japan.

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