Share this article

print logo

AROUND THE NATION

Cannibal suspect faces charges in 2nd attack

BALTIMORE (AP) -- A Maryland cannibalism suspect faces an attempted-murder charge in a different attack at a Baltimore university dorm.

Alexander Kinyua, 21, already faced assault and reckless endangerment charges in the May attack at Morgan State University. But a Baltimore grand jury Thursday indicted him on the more serious charges of first- and second-degree attempted murder, first- and second-degree assault and a weapons offense.

Joshua Ceasar said Kinyua hit him over the head with a baseball bat wrapped in barbed wire and chains as he walked into Kinyua's campus apartment, knocking him out. Friends told Ceasar they discovered Kinyua standing over him with a knife. Days later, Ceasar learned Kinyua had told the Harford County Sheriff's investigators that he used a knife to kill and carve up Kujoe Bonsafo Agyei-Kodie, 37, before eating his heart and brain. Agyei-Kodie, a native of Ghana, had been staying at the Kinyua family's home for about six weeks when he disappeared May 25. Kinyua was charged with murder and assault in the killing.

***

Holder eyes meeting with Issa on gun probe

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. is proposing to meet with Rep. Darrell Issa by Monday to settle a dispute over Justice Department documents the congressman is demanding on the Fast and Furious program, a flawed gun-smuggling probe.

Holder said Thursday the department is prepared to turn over documents detailing how Justice Department officials came to the realization that federal agents in Arizona had used a controversial investigative tactic that resulted in hundreds of illicitly purchased guns winding up in Mexico, many of them at crime scenes. Two of the weapons were recovered at the scene of the slaying of a U.S. border agent, Brian Terry.

In a letter to Issa, the attorney general said the information he is prepared to provide will fully address concerns of the congressman and House Republican leaders. Issa, R-Calif., has scheduled a committee vote for next Wednesday on a contempt citation against Holder for failing to turn over relevant documents on the operation and its aftermath.

***

Grueling hike nets granddad 27 months

PHOENIX -- An Indiana man convicted of child abuse for forcing his three grandsons on a grueling hike in the Grand Canyon was sentenced to 27 months in prison on Thursday, the minimum term the judge could have imposed.

Christopher Alan Carlson, 45, already has served nearly 10 months in prison and could be eligible for early release, so he may only have to be in prison for another 11 months.

U.S. District Judge Frederick Martone said the fact that Carlson obviously cares very much for his grandchildren and that he has struggled with attention-deficit disorder and hyperactivity his whole life helped him conclude that Carlson deserved the lighter sentence. He could have been ordered imprisoned for up to 17 years.

Carlson told the court that he would never hurt his grandchildren and that he just wanted to show them the beauty of the Grand Canyon.

Shortly after his arrest in August, Carlson told investigators that his grandsons were overweight and that he thought hiking the Grand Canyon would get them into shape. They were 8, 9 and 12 at the time.

The oldest boy told jurors that he secretly asked a hiker to call 911 toward the end of the Aug. 28 hike after he began throwing up and fell down because of cramping.