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3 more accusers take stand in Sandusky trial

The prosecution's case in Jerry Sandusky's sex abuse trial neared its conclusion Thursday after just four days of testimony, with three more accusers taking the witness stand, including a young man who said the former Penn State assistant football coach raped him as a teen guest in Sandusky's home.

The eighth accuser to testify told jurors the abuse began with fondling and forced oral sex and led to several instances of rape in the basement of Sandusky's Centre County home, where he spent more than 100 nights and where his muffled screams went unanswered by Sandusky's wife, Dottie, who was upstairs. He said he figured the basement must be soundproof.

"He got real aggressive and just forced me into it," said the young man, now 18 and a recent high school graduate. "And I just went with it -- there was no fighting against it."

He said under cross-examination by Sandusky lawyer Joe Amendola that the attacks sometimes left him bleeding but that he never sought medical attention.

"I just dealt with it," he said.

Another accuser told jurors Sandusky called himself the "tickle monster" before embracing him in a shower.

Also testifying was Anthony Sassano, an investigator with the Attorney General's Office, who disclosed that the office learned of a key witness, Mike McQueary, after an anonymous letter was sent to Centre County prosecutors.

Judge John Cleland told jurors there would be no court today and to return Monday.

A third accuser, known as Victim 3, was an Army National Guard soldier who testified Thursday that despite being fondled by Sandusky he had viewed him as a father figure and was crushed when he was sent to a group home and Sandusky never contacted him again.

"I would pray he would call me and maybe find a way to get me out of there," he said, "but it never happened."

"He made me feel like I was a part of something, like a family," the man said. "He gave me things that I hadn't had before."

He said that he loved Sandusky and that Sandusky treated him like he was part of an extended family that made him feel "unconditionally loved."

Sandusky's arrest brought disgrace to Penn State and led to the ouster of both the school's president and its Hall of Fame football coach Joe Paterno.