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Newlywed Dufner makes winning a habit

IRVING, Texas -- A month ago, Jason Dufner was a single man still in search of his first PGA Tour victory.

Life has certainly changed for the 35-year-old golfer who last summer at the PGA Championship blew a four-stroke lead with four holes to play and lost in a playoff.

With a 25-foot birdie putt on the final hole of the Byron Nelson Championship on Sunday, Dufner closed out a one-stroke victory over Dicky Pride to win for the second time in four weeks.

"You probably couldn't dream it any better than what's been going on here," Dufner said. "The wedding has been in the works for close to a year, so we know that's been coming around the corner. And there's been a lot of good golf since then, but to win two events and get married in the span of 22 days, pretty remarkable."

Dufner got his first victory April 29 at New Orleans, then got married the following week.

Now he has already won again, this time making $1.17 million and taking over the top spot in the FedEx Cup standings.

His closing birdie wrapped up a 3-under 67 round for an 11-under 269 to avoid a playoff with Pride.

Joe Durant, who was the final alternate added to the Nelson field, shot a 65 to finish in a tie for third at 271 with Henry (68), Marc Leishman (66) and rookie Jonas Blixt (66).


Munoz wins amid controversy

GLADSTONE, N.J. -- Azahara Munoz is never going to forget her first LPGA Tour win. It was as emotional as it was controversial and possibly tainted.

Munoz beat Candie Kung, 2 and 1, on Sunday to win the Sybase Match Play Championship, a title that was set up when Morgan Pressel was penalized for slow play while in control of their semifinal match.

Pressel was one of the first to hug and congratulate Munoz, her good friend, but she also had to be feeling this could have been her first win since 2008 just as easily.

It all reverted to the morning semifinal in which Munoz and Pressel were both slow, although Munoz was admittedly a little slower. They were warned about slow play after nine holes and put on the clock after No. 11.

The 12th hole changed everything. Pressel won it with a par to seemingly take a 3-up lead.

However, before she could tee off on No. 13, tour official Doug Brecht informed her that she was being penalized for slow play. She had taken 2:09 to play her three shots, 39 seconds over the 30-second limit per shot.

In match play, a time penalty is the loss of the previous hole and that handed the admittedly slow-playing Munoz the hole. She was 1-down and back in the match.

"It was tough timing because it was a really big, I think, turning point in the match, going from 2-up to 3-up, and then all of a sudden back to 1-up," said Pressel, who was on the verge of tears several times in a post-match news conference after she beat Vicky Hurst, 2 and 1, in the consolation match. "You know, it was -- I mean, it was really unfortunate."

The time penalty was the first for Pressel in seven years on the tour.

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