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Panetta apologizes for gruesome photos of troops, corpses

Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta apologized Wednesday for gruesome, newly revealed photographs that show U.S. soldiers posing with the bloodied remains of dead insurgents in Afghanistan. He said war can lead young troops to "foolish decisions" and expressed concern the photos could incite fresh violence against Americans.

The White House called the 2-year-old photos "reprehensible," joining Panetta and other top military officials in expressing regret for the latest in a string of embarrassing missteps by the U.S. military in a war that's built on earning the trust and confidence of ordinary Afghans. In recent months, American troops have been caught up in controversies over burning Muslim holy books, urinating on Afghan corpses, an alleged massacre of 17 Afghan villagers and other misdeeds.

"This is war. I know that war is ugly and it's violent, and I know that young people sometimes caught up in the moment make some very foolish decisions," Panetta said. "I am not excusing that behavior, but neither do I want these images to bring further injury to our people or to our relationship with the Afghan people.

"My apology is on behalf of the Department of Defense and the U.S. government," Panetta told a news conference in Brussels after a meeting of NATO allies at which the way ahead in Afghanistan was the central topic.

The photos were published in Wednesday's Los Angeles Times. One shows members of the 82nd Airborne Division posing in 2010 with Afghan police holding the severed legs of a suicide bomber. The same platoon a few months later was sent to investigate the remains of three insurgents reported to have accidentally blown themselves up -- and soldiers again posed and mugged for a photo with the remains, the newspaper said.

A photo from the second incident appears to show the hand of a dead insurgent resting on a U.S. soldier's shoulder as the soldier smiles.

Panetta said he had urged the newspaper not to publish the photos, which it said it was given by a member of the 82nd Airborne.

"The reason for that is those kinds of photos are used by the enemy to incite violence, and lives have been lost by the publication of similar photos in the past," he said in Brussels. His British counterpart, Philip Hammond, said he regretted the "besmirching of the good name" of all coalition troops who act properly.

There was no evidence of a violent Afghan backlash in the first hours following the photographs' publication.

In fact, there was no immediate comment from the Afghan government or President Hamid Karzai's office, and many officials said they were not aware of the pictures, which were taken in Zabul province.

Andrew Exum, a former Army captain who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, said he doubted the photos would cause a big stir among Afghans.

"Speaking bluntly, most Afghans are probably not going to be terribly offended by the body of a suicide bomber being treated in less than respectful ways," said Exum, now an analyst at the Center for a New American Security in Washington.

The 82nd Airborne, based at Fort Bragg, N.C., confirmed that the pictured soldiers are members of the 1st Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade. The brigade returned from a yearlong deployment to Afghanistan in August 2010. The 82nd Airborne referred questions about the matter to the Pentagon.

President Obama's chief spokesman, Jay Carney, called the picture-taking "reprehensible." He said Obama favors an investigation but did not know if the president had seen the photos.

The Washington Post contributed to this report.