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Louvre goes visual with electronic guides

The Louvre Museum is used to dealing with antiquities: Nearly all of its thousands of works of art date to 1848 or earlier. Now, it wants to create a relic of its own -- the old museum audio guide.

The famed Paris museum, whose origins date to the 18th century, is pressing on toward modernity and going visual with new electronic guides in a deal with Japan's Nintendo. The guides provide 3DS game consoles that offer touch-screen, visual-and-audio guidance for visitors who teem the museum's labyrinthine halls by the millions each year.

Billed as an unprecedented innovation at a museum, the game consoles launched this week offer 700 recordings on famed works like the Venus de Milo, Winged Victory of Samothrace and the Mona Lisa -- only a tiny sliver of the 35,000-odd works displayed in the museum.

The electronic guides, both navigational and informative, offer virtual glimpses of the artistic touches that are tough for the naked eye to see, like tiny details on towering tableaux on the museum's wood-paneled walls. They'll use much of the same information in the Louvre's now-shelved audio guides.

Pairing France's highest-of-high-brow museums with a Japanese technology company behind games like Donkey Kong, Mario Brothers and Zelda might not seem like a natural fit. But Louvre officials say the museum must change with the times, and try to access as wide a public possible.

Above all, the console is meant to reach out to the Louvre's customer base: the museum welcomed 8.9 million visitors last year -- more than half of them under age 30, and about two-thirds foreign.

The guides, for now are available in seven languages and cost $6.50 on top of the museum's $13 standard admission price.

Press a button, and the viewer virtually floats over, say, statues by Michelangelo, or zooms up close on the tiny cracks in the face of the Mona Lisa -- all but impossible to see from behind a crowded rope line.

The biggest benefit may be helping art lovers get around: Visitors see their location, which blinks inside a diagram of exhibit rooms on one of the console's two screens. A menu allows for a specific search for one of 50 of the museum's most popular works and can plot a path to get there. Another feature is a "masterpieces" walk.