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THE DAILY DISH

"We must oppose the senseless killing of life for any reason ... " Jane Goodall
Foxx: Among Time's top 100
Rivers: Friends of the bride

An influential Time

President Bush, Academy Award winner Jamie Foxx and domestic diva Martha Stewart have all made Time Magazine's list of the world's 100 most influential people.

The eclectic list, which hits newsstands today, ranges from the Dalai Lama to terrorist leader Abu Musab al-Zarqawi to Nobel laureate Nelson Mandela. Hailing from 31 different countries, and including rappers, designers, world leaders and a tsunami survivor, the listed newsmakers have shaped the world in some way, according to the magazine's editors.

"It really shows the breadth of human endeavor," Time's managing editor Jim Kelly said. "Influence can be defined in a myriad of ways."

Those named were profiled by people who have themselves been in the spotlight.

Democratic strategist James Carville discusses Karl Rove, architect of George Bush's re-election campaign; director Oliver Stone praises Academy Award-winner Jamie Foxx; celebrity CEO Donald Trump weighs in on celebrity CEO Martha Stewart.

Goodall's new cause

Jane Goodall, best known for studying primates in Africa, now wants to save exotic deer.

Goodall sent a letter to officials at Point Reyes (Calif.) National Seashore who plan to eliminate more than 1,000 non-native deer from the park using shotguns and contraception.

"We must oppose the senseless killing of life for any reason and choose alternatives to the lethal removal currently under consideration in your park," Goodall wrote.

Park biologists say the rapidly expanding populations of fallow and axis deer in the park 40 miles north of San Francisco threaten the park's fragile ecosystem.

No toasters, please

What to give newlyweds who don't want for much?

Comedian Joan Rivers, one of about 800 guests at Prince Charles and Camilla's wedding reception on Saturday, joked that she wanted to bring a trendy grill with a French fry attachment. Then she thought about giving the blushing bride - now the Duchess of Cornwall - a lingerie shower.

"She thought that was hilarious, and she said, "Well, send the things,' " Rivers told the Associated Press on Sunday. "She's a very earthy, funny woman. You can swear in front of her."

In the end, Rivers abided by a request for guests to forgo gifts, but said she plans to put the lingerie in the mail for the new Duchess of Cornwall.

A gift of better sight

Author Tom Clancy, who reaped millions from blockbusters such as "Patriot Games" and "The Hunt for Red October," wants people to see life a little more clearly.

To that end, he has donated $2 million to fund a professorship in ophthalmology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

The first doctor to hold the seat being funded by Clancy's donation, Dr. Terrence P. O'Brien, has treated the writer, who was diagnosed in 2001 with pathological myopia. The rare type of nearsightedness, in which the eyeball continues to elongate, can lead to profound vision loss.

Clancy has been a longtime supporter of Johns Hopkins' Wilmer Eye Institute and has included the institute in his books. The wife of his swashbuckling character Jack Ryan, for example, is a surgeon at the institute.